Tag Archives: summer berries

Gooseberries Galore

Gooseberries bumper crop

I couldn’t finish this megaseason for the humble gooseberry without sharing a few of the recipes I’ve tried this year – as well as the usual pies, crumbles, fools and shortbreads, of course, and stowing far too many in the freezer, to say nothing of giving lots away. I have two gooseberry bushes at the allotment, one green variety, Invicta, a highly prolific and viciously prickly, mildew-resistant form, which never fails to produce excellent crops, and a red dessert variety, Pax, less prickly, but not as prolific. Despite netting, it’s always a race to get to the berries when they turn red before the birds do! This year, though, I was onto them and have picked the berries red, rather than waiting for them to turn black – result! They made a divine cloud-like fool, with just puréed gooseberries (500g), cooked with a dash of elderflower cordial and 75g sugar, cooled, sieved to remove the seeds and skins, then folded into 150ml softly whipped cream. Heavenly.

Pink gooseberry and elederflower fool

The Invictas, on the other hand, are so prolific that I didn’t know what to do with them all. Picking them is a challenge (especially with a wedding coming up, and trying to keep my hands and arms scratch-free!), so I decided to be brutal and prune the bush drastically in the process. This had the added advantage of allowing me to sit in the shade of my established apple tree, out of the scorching sun, to take the individual berries off the branches – much less risky!

Gooseberry branches picking

So what to do with all this fruit? Online research suggested a gooseberry chutney courtesy of Nigel Slater, not cooked to death as with many chutney recipes, but a lighter preserve, perfect for spicing up cold meats and cheese – definitely worth a try.

Gooseberry Chutney

Gooseberry chutney

 250g granulated sugar
2 large onions
300g tomatoes
1 kg gooseberries
200g raisins
150ml cider vinegar
150ml white wine vinegar
15 cardamom pods
12 black peppercorns
1 tsp coriander seeds
1 tsp salt

Peel and chop the onions, then put in a large pan. Add the chopped tomatoes, raisin and vinegar ( I used all cider vinegar as that’s what I had). Open the cardamom pods and crush the seeds with the black peppercorns, then add to the pan with the coriander seeds. Simmer gently while you top and tail the gooseberries.

Add 750g gooseberries to the pan and 1 tsp salt, then cook over a gentle heat for 30 minutes, stirring frequently to prevent sticking. After 30 minutes, stir in the sugar until it dissolves , then cook for a further 10 minutes. Stir in the remaining gooseberries and cook for another 2-3 minutes until the added gooseberries are just cooked. Pour into sterilised jars, cover and seal. Set aside for at least a week before serving with cold meats and/or cheese.

My final gooseberry suggestion for this season is a delicious gooseberry & elderflower yogurt ice cream. I suppose it’s not unlike a frozen fool, but this time with yogurt to cut through the richness – mmmmm…. don’t mind if I do.

Gooseberry & Elderflower Yogurt Ice Cream

500g gooseberries, topped and tailed
75g elderflower cordial
125g granulated sugar
150 ml natural yogurt (full-fat)
150ml double cream

Cook the gooseberries over a gentle heat with the elderflower cordial and the sugar until softened – about 5-10 minutes. Allow to cool completely, then purée in a blender and sieve to remove the seeds.

Stir in the cream and natural yogurt and mix well. Transfer to an ice cream maker and churn until it resembles soft ice cream. Transfer to the freezer to finish.

Serve with gooseberry pies or crumbles, or just as it is, in a bowl, with a big grin on your face. This is so good….

Soft fruit harvest

 

 

 

 

Advertisements

Back to breakfasts

New arch

It really has been an outstanding year for soft fruit: raspberries and gooseberries in particular. Overwhelming at times! I’ve been enjoying fresh raspberries on my breakfast granola for weeks, desserts have been a cinch with fresh berries, panna cotta and red berry compote, and raspberry ice cream (same as my recipe for strawberry ice cream, but with puréed and sieved raspberries – the seeds are quite obtrusive otherwise), and some have gone in the freezer along with pots of raspberry coulis.

Panna cotta with red berry compote

I’ve also made two large batches of raspberry jam with an eye to making my son’s Victoria sponge wedding cake at the end of July – next week in fact! One was my favourite easy raspberry jam, boiled for just 2 minutes after adding the sugar. For the last batch the raspberries were tailing off slightly (I only managed to pick 1kg at a time!), so I added 500g redcurrants and made raspberry & redcurrant – equally delicious and perhaps a firmer set with the extra pectin from the redcurrants.

Raspberry & Redcurrant Jam – makes 6 jars

Raspberry redcurrant jam_cropped

1kg raspberries
500g redcurrants, strigged
500ml water
1.5kg granulated sugar

Put the raspberries, strigged redcurrants and water in a large preserving pan and simmer gently for 15 minutes until the fruit is very soft and the juice is running. Stir in the granulated sugar until it dissolves, bring back to the boil, then boil quickly for 7-10 minutes or until drips run together when you hold up the spoon, or use the chilled saucer test by turning off the heat, adding a blob of hot jam to a saucer straight from the freezer, and leaving for a few minutes to see if the surface wrinkles when you gently push it with your finger. Pot into hot, sterilised jars and cover immediately.

I must share a new granola recipe I’ve tried recently too – I love my coconut granola, but my local wholefood store in the village had run out of one of the essential ingredients, coconut flakes, recently, so I was forced to look around for a different recipe. This one, by Rachel Allen, majors on nuts and makes for a delicious alternative. I’ve replaced the original honey with maple syrup, but feel free to use whichever you prefer:

Nutty Granola

125g butter
150ml maple syrup
1tsp vanilla extract
500g oats
100g cashew nuts
100g flaked almonds
100g desiccated coconut
100g pumpkin seeds
100g sunflower seeds
250g dried fruit (dates, sultanas, apricots, etc.)

Preheat the oven to 150°C / Gas 3. Melt the butter, maple syrup and vanilla extract in a pan over a gentle heat. Add the remaining ingredients apart from the dried fruit to a large mixing bowl and stir in the melted butter mixture. Divide over two large baking trays, and bake for 15 minutes, changing the position of the trays halfway through. Then remove from the oven, tip back into the bowl and mix well. Return to the baking trays and cook for a further 10 minutes to brown and crisp all over. Allow to cool completely before storing in a large container.

Serve with yogurt and fresh fruit of your choice – raspberries are the perfect accompaniment, of course.

Still a very busy time of year in the garden with the prolonged dry spell and hot weather, making daily watering at the allotment and my pots at home an absolute must. I’ve resorted to doing home in the morning and the allotment in the evening in an attempt to lighten the load – while watering standing on one leg to try and incorporate my ACL physio in the process! Yet everything is coming on in leaps and bounds; I’ve even had to repot my aubergines into supersize pots, so triffid-like was their growth! The brassicas – purple-sprouting broccoli, cavolo nero and calabrese – were planted out last weekend, so I should be able to concentrate on harvesting and watering from now on. Roll on the season of plenty…

Aubergine triffids