Tag Archives: spring tasks

Spring is in the air…

Aquilegia and hellebore foliage

I can’t believe it’s over a month since I last wrote – so much for my good intentions! What with pressures of work, a skiing holiday, decorators in painting the kitchen /utility room after having a new oak floor fitted at the end of last year, a wedding food tasting and lots of family visits, blog-writing has definitely taken a back seat of late. This weekend was Mother’s Day, with one son and his fiancée home, then a trip over to my parents’ to see all the family on Sunday – and beautiful spring weather for once too!

The recent springlike weather has tempted me out into the garden to mow my lawn (just the once!), cut back my buddleias and the giant lavatera, prune the roses, dead-head last year’s hydrangea flowers and chop back any remaining perennials that I’d left through the winter to provide shelter and food for birds and insects. There was still a cold wind when I ventured out on Saturday afternoon, but I was determined to pot up my new dahlia tubers from Sarah Raven and the overwintered monster begonias. I also sowed the first batch of seeds, always an exciting moment: sweet peas in pots on the conservatory windowsill (I’ve reverted to trying some inside this year after such a late crop last year, but I will plant more straight into the ground later too, when the soil warms up). Tomatoes (my favourite Sungold and the old-fashioned Ailsa Craig), chillis (Summer Heat and Padron), Romano sweet peppers, aubergine Bonica, lobelia Crystal Palace, and the three leek varieties Bandit, Pandora and Nipper for a succession of leeks all through the autumn/winter – all now tucked up in the propagator. Let the season commence!

Back side bed

I’ve still to distribute last year’s compost around the garden, but there’s always next weekend… In the meantime, let me finish with a springtime lemon & ricotta cake I adapted from a River Café recipe. I had some ricotta in the fridge and fancied a light, lemony and gluten-free cake. This was the result – exactly what I was looking for. The original quantities make a huge cake – I didn’t have a tin big enough and there were only five of us for dinner, so I cut the quantities back by a third – perfect. I found the original recipe here if you’re catering for a crowd!

River Café Lemon, Ricotta, Almond & Polenta Cake – serves 10

Lemon ricotta cake

150g butter, softened
170g ground almonds (you could also use almond flour)
65g fine polenta (whizz in the food processor if you can’t buy fine)
finely grated zest of 4 lemons
170g caster sugar
4 large eggs, separated
200g ricotta
juice of 2 lemons
icing sugar, for dusting

Pre-heat the oven to 150°C.  Grease a 24cm round springform cake tin and line the base with greaseproof paper.

Combine the almonds and polenta (whizzed in the food processor for extra fineness if necessary) and add the lemon zest. Beat the butter and sugar together using an electric mixer until pale and light.  Add the egg yolks one by one, then add the almond mixture and fold together. Put the ricotta into a bowl and beat lightly with a fork, then add the lemon juice. Stir the ricotta into the cake mixture. Whisk the egg whites in a clean bowl until they form soft peaks.  Finally fold the egg whites into the almond mixture.

Transfer the mixture into the prepared tin and bake in the oven for 40 – 50 minutes, until set.  Test by inserting a skewer, which should come out clean.  Leave in the tin to cool for at least 10 minutes before turning out. Dust liberally with sifted icing sugar before serving, and garnish with fine strips of lemon rind if desired.

I served it with a jostaberry purée from the freezer, but any red fruit coulis would be good – and it was delicious on its own too. Enjoy!

Standen March 2017
Beautiful Standen near East Grinstead – perfect Mother’s Day outing

 

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Chasing my tail

Broad beans and rapeseed

Here I am again, chasing my tail trying to get my garden ship-shape and ready for summer, despite the fact that we’re less than a week away from the longest day. Whatever happened to those, long, balmy evenings and sun-blessed days? It’s hardly June-like here, with torrential rain one day and dismal murk the next. My tomato plants, planted in their final positions outdoors a few weeks ago, have sulked since moving outside and it’s hard to believe they’ll be healthy, fruiting plants in a few short months… I delayed planting my French and runner beans at the start of the month due to the high winds and cold temperatures, but they’ve gone in now and will have to fend for themselves, along with the courgettes, squashes and sweetcorn.

Broad beans and basil

On the plus side, my broad beans are fantastic this year, now starting to reach harvesting size (typically just before I go on holiday!). I picked my first crop of tender baby beans this week to steam with asparagus and mint as an accompaniment to my friend’s delicious Shetland lamb chops. So good. I picked so many that I was able to give half away and still have enough to toss in the first pesto sauce of the season with pasta, caramelised onions and toasted pine nuts the following night.

Broad bean pasta

Strawberries too are coming thick and fast – little sign of slug damage yet, so perhaps those nematodes are getting to work at last. A shame that they aren’t having the same effect on my salad bed, where I’m still struggling to get lettuce past the germination stage before they’re munched off in their prime! In desperation, I’ve resorted to sowing some in a seed tray at home for planting out when they are a little more established….

I finally managed to finish planting up my new oak barrels at home this week – must be an all-time record for me to fill my summer containers so late in June! The old and disintegrating barrels in situ were well past their sell-by date – but as they made the move down from Scotland with us some 13 years ago and we’d had them in the Scottish garden for a good few years beforehand, I don’t suppose they owe me anything! It was quite a job emptying and refilling five full-sized half-barrels, so hardly surprising that it took me so long. Now filled with my giant tuberous begonias, fibrous begonias, lobelia and double petunias, I’m hoping for a spectacular display once they get going – slugs and snails permitting!

New barrel near gate

One final job I’ve been keen to do before the holiday season is upon us is to make my elderflower cordial. There’s an elder bush just down the road from where I live that’s absolutely laden with blossom this year – but I’d rather pick my elderflowers from a hedgerow away from road fumes if at all possible, so I’ve been holding on and dodging the showers, waiting for the perfect moment to harvest. Success at last one day this week, on a blustery dog walk down near my local reservoir: steeped overnight in their sugar and lemon solution, they are now bottled as the quintessential elderflower cordial, perfect for Hugo cocktails with Prosecco and lemon, as a refreshing long drink with sparkling water, or added to panna cotta or gooseberry compote for a certain je ne sais quoi… I wouldn’t be without it.

Elderflower Cordial – makes 2-3 (750ml) bottles

Elderflower cordial
20 or so heads of elderflower
2 pints boiling water
3lb granulated sugar
juice and grated zest of 2 lemons
1 tbsp citric acid

Pour the boiling water onto the sugar in a large preserving pan and stir over a medium heat until dissolved. Add the lemon juice, grated zest, citric acid and elderflowers (stripped of any chunky green stems, but left as heads). Cover with a tea towel and leave for 24 hours. Strain through a sieve lined with muslin into a large jug and pour through a funnel into sterilised bottles.
Keeps for several months in a dark place – refrigerate once opened.

Gardening Crescendo

Back garden 2016 June

May/June is the time of year when a gardener’s activity levels reach a crescendo: tender plants to be transplanted outside, frames and supports to be constructed, late summer veg seeds to be sown, containers to be emptied of their faded bulbs and tired spring foliage, then rejuvenated with bright new summer bedding colour…. Inevitably there just aren’t enough hours in the day, especially when you’ve been delayed (again!) by a cold, late spring, and only have the weekend to get on in the garden.

And yet, somehow, it all gets done. Not quite yet, here at least, but it’s getting there. Last weekend I potted on my tomatoes and put up the bamboo frame that supports them against the sunny back of the house. Aubergines, peppers, chillis were all potted into bigger pots and returned to the conservatory. I sowed brassicas: calabrese, cavolo nero and purple-sprouting broccoli, plus a new one for me, cauliflower (Snowball). Last year’s Romanesco experiment was disappointing – very small heads and not much taste, so I thought I’d try the more traditional cauliflowers instead. Wallflower and sweet william also went in for early flowers next spring.

I had intended to plant out my tender courgettes, squash and sweetcorn up at the allotment, but a combination of a bank holiday, family around and other things going on meant I didn’t get chance – and just as well! Temperatures plummeted on Monday and we’ve had the most horrendous cold, wet and windy weather this week, most untypical for June. Judging by the state of my allotment neighbour’s young bean plants, any plants I had dared to plant out would have been whipped to shreds! Instead, they’ve been hardening off in the cold frame and went out in the more seasonal 20°C of this weekend. Second sowings of peas and finally time to erect the bean frame and sow French, runner and borlotti beans direct in the ground.

Germination has been sketchy on salad crops like lettuce and rocket – or more likely the slugs have been feasting yet again, despite frequent applications of organic slug pellets. In desperation I’ve ordered and applied (in the pouring rain, as recommended!) a nematode solution, both at the allotments and at home. Last time I tried, I found it singularly ineffective, but I suspect the soil temperature wasn’t warm enough. This time, that shouldn’t be an issue, but of course these biological pest controls take time to infest the host pests and can’t be expected to work overnight. Cue more slug pellets in the interim…

So what’s left to do? Just the mere task of emptying my old oak barrels of their spring planting schemes and replacing them with new barrels, bought earlier this year, drainage holes drilled and raring to go. The existing ones have been rotting gently for a couple of years now, so about time too – and hopefully getting rid of the decaying wood should eliminate some of the slugs and vine weevil grubs undoubtedly skulking in their depths. That’s next weekend’s job, though – or perhaps one a night in the evenings next week, work and weather permitting? We’ll see…

Strawberry

In the meantime, the first strawberry of the year was a welcome treat yesterday – as was the delightful open gardens tour in my village today: all the best gardeners deserve time off for inspiration! Weather, views and gardens to die for – and delicious tea and cake in the village church too. A gardener can but dream….

Wadhurst open gardens June 2016

 

Tiptoe through the tulips…

Jan Reus tulips-001

Despite the lateness of the season, this has been a splendid year for tulips after all. My last, the delectable cream and lilac Atlantis (below), have just come into bloom and we’re almost at the end of May! The beautiful burgundy shot silk Jan Reus (above) have just gone over, having come out weeks ago, and I’ve had a succession of others in between. Once again, I’ve been glad that I didn’t plant them up in mixtures, as there seems no way of guaranteeing that they’ll all come out together. Far better, in my view, to have a solid block of colour in one pot and know that they will all be out at the same time.

Tulip Atlantis

I had two double varieties this year, Antraciet, a deep blood red, and Chato, a flamboyant magenta pink. Both have been superb, but (note to self!) very top-heavy in rain, especially the huge, paeony-flowered Chato. After an initial dry spell, we had a short, sharp shower one afternoon and I went out afterwards to find half my blooms neatly snapped off about four inches beneath the flower! Fortunately, I strive to have a vase for every occasion, so for once had my own tulips all over the house as cut flowers. They lasted surprisingly well, becoming even more exotic as they faded and you could appreciate them at close quarters. Still, I don’t think I’ll be cutting them deliberately any time soon…

Tulip Chato in tub
Tulip Chato

The glass “caterpillar” vase I was given for Christmas came in particularly handy for displaying a row of decapitated Chato flowerheads, and an antique turquoise jug looked superb too:

The double Antraciet, planted in big wooden barrels like all of my container-grown tulips, were weeks after my friend’s garden-planted bulbs of the same variety – perhaps mine were planted more deeply? Either way, when they finally opened, they were lovely, not quite as blowsy as Chato, but a gorgeous, rich maroon colour, almost deep fuchsia pink in bright sunlight. Not being quite as huge, they seemed to fare better with the rain too, although I did find them covered in slugs and snails as I walked past one showery evening! If it’s not one thing, it’s another….

Tulips Anthraciet
Tulip Antraciet

The earliest of my tulips  to flower were perhaps the most disappointing, the scented bronzy-orange Request. I had planted these in a tub where I knew there were already some feathered yellow early tulips, planted very deep, which come up year on year, and the whole barrel stands in front of a glorious golden philadelphus (the deliciously-scented mock orange or Philadelphus coronariusAureus‘). Colourwise, the combination was stunning, but sadly only 7 of the 15 new tulips I’d planted flowered – the rest were blind. Sarah Raven, good as ever, have credited my account for replacement tulips next season, but it is disappointing not to get quite the show you’d anticipated. I couldn’t detect any particular scent from the tulips either – but hey, you can’t win them all!

Tulip Request & yellow

So, a good year for tulips, all in all, but I think next year I’ll try and remember not to order such late varieties. As it is, I’m now going to have a bit of a scramble to empty this year’s containers and plant up my summer schemes in a relatively short space of time. Fortunately, I’ve finally managed to track down some large oak half-barrels to replace my existing ones, which are falling apart after a good 20 years’ sterling service! They are far too heavy to lift once planted up, so I’m still going to have to empty the old ones before I can remove them and plant up the new models in situ. A good excuse for a complete change of compost (and hopefully get rid of any vine weevil grubs that will inevitably be lurking in the old barrels after all this time).
Brandy Snap tulips allotment

The remaining bulbs can be planted up at the allotment, or on my dry and sunny bed at the front of the house, to see if they come good another year. After an excellent showing of the Brandy Snap collection I transplanted two years ago, I’m hopeful that they will flower again at some point – but I still only transplant decent-sized bulbs. If they’ve split into little bulblets when you dig them up, it’s unlikely they’ll come again and can just be discarded. Thank you, tulips, for a magnificent month of colour!

Spring Rush

Green roof_cropped

It’s at this time of year, after the clocks have gone forward, the sun finally shows its face and the soil gradually starts to warm up, that the rush is on to get everything going in the garden. It’s often a case of dodging the showers and making use of the limited time you have available to sow seeds here, prepare ground there and generally tick off all those spring jobs.

I sowed my first seeds two weeks ago, but most are now up and can be removed from the propagator to make room for the next batch: tomatoes (two old favourites, Sungold and Gardener’s Delight, and a new variety to me, Black Russian, a medium beefsteak heritage tomato, supposedly with an outstanding, rich flavour – we shall see!) and cucumber. I’m reverting back to Marketmore this year, a variety I used to grow with great success in my big greenhouse in Scotland, but I’m hoping it will like the conditions on the open allotment too, as I haven’t had a lot of success with other varieties I’ve tried outside to date.

Other jobs include planting up my new dahlias. I leave my existing dahlia tubers in the ground over the winter, well-mulched, and they seem to thrive, but as I’m cutting down on potatoes and adding another cutting flower bed at the allotment this year, it seemed an ideal opportunity to treat myself to a couple more! I ordered Café au Lait (from Crocus) plus Labyrinth and Wizard of Oz (from Sarah Raven), all in pastel shades that will extend my existing range of colours beautifully – and with half an eye to my son’s wedding next year, I must admit! These are started off in pots in my grow frame at home, then will go into the open ground when they are established and better able to cope with slug attacks. I’ve also started off my tuberous begonias, now huge tubers after two seasons’ worth of growing. I may have to ask friends for the loan of some space in their large glasshouse when I run out of room in the grow frame/conservatory windowsill for these monsters!

I also like to use fibrous-rooted begonias in my summer tubs as they don’t mind rain or shine and are also pretty slug-resistant. I buy the tiny plug plants from my local garden centre, sold in 24s for pricking out at home. In actual fact, each plug often contains two tiny plants and I invariably manage to get at least 60 plantlets once I’ve prised them apart. A very economical way of buying bedding plants, especially as these are notoriously tricky to grow from seed without specialist conditions.

Other jobs included dead-heading last year’s hydrangea flowers, another way of instantly tidying up the garden. These crispy flowerheads have done a great job of protecting the new foliage from late frosts, but we should be safe now to snip them off – although I once did this in late March when we lived in Scotland, only to have a very severe frost a couple of nights later, ending up with frosted new shoots and far fewer flowers than usual – you have been warned!

New rasp bed 2

Down at the allotment, I finally managed to finish digging over my new raspberry bed and have planted up the new autumn canes, Polka, ordered from Thompson & Morgan. Having lost all my autumn raspberries last year due to some unknown virus, I thought I’d try a different variety: Polka is bred from the classic Autumn Bliss, but it supposed to have double the yield. I’ll report back in due course! I also dug up some summer raspberry suckers from where they are thriving underneath the Bramley apple tree and made a new row of summer fruit too – you can never have enough raspberries! I’ve finally found a taker for the top part of my allotment, so won’t have my original fruit bed any more – but I don’t think I’m going to go short any time soon….

Raspberry Polka

All in all, a very satisfying weekend’s gardening.

After a meat-filled few days over Easter, with family and guests, I fancied something simple and vegetarian this weekend. There’s very little left on the allotment at this time of year (a few remaining leeks, parsnips, purple-sprouting broccoli and spinach), so I opted for an old favourite, based on spinach, originally from my friend Bridget up in Cheshire. This is so quick and easy, but delicious – life’s definitely NOT too short to stuff a mushroom!

Garlicky Stuffed Mushrooms – serves 2

Garlicky mushroom

4 large flat mushrooms (Portobello), wiped and stalks removed

Knob of butter

1 medium onion, chopped

1 clove garlic

2 generous handfuls of young spinach, washed, large stems removed and chopped

Seasoning

1 Boursin cheese

 Melt the butter in a frying pan and add the chopped onions and garlic. Cook until translucent, then add the chopped spinach and continue cooking for 5 mins or so until nicely wilted, then season to taste.

Divide the spinach and onion mixture between the flat mushrooms in a roasting tin and add 3-4 tbsp water to the base of the tin. Top each mushroom with a generous slice of Boursin (blue cheese or even goat’s cheese also work well). Cover the tin with foil.

Cook in a hot oven (180°C, Gas 5) for about 20 minutes, then remove the foil and cook for a further couple of minutes to brown the cheese slightly.

You can serve these with crusty bread to mop up the garlicky juices, but I like them just as they are – who needs meat with flavours as good as these?!

Green roofs, sowing seeds – it must be Spring!

After a few days away, I’ve returned home to a garden that’s considerably drier than it has been in months and with a fair sprinkling of crocuses, daffodils and hyacinths brightening the horizon every which way you look. Thursday, my first day back, was also gloriously sunny, although the weekend, when I first had chance to get out in the garden, has been cold and overcast for the most part, with the sun finally deigning to shine this afternoon.

Daffodil tub against fence
Weather or no weather, it’s been great to get out and finally start on those Spring tasks: I mowed the lawn yesterday, which instantly makes the garden look a whole lot better. I’ve also planted up my latest project, a log store with a green roof, inspired by seeing a similar design for a wheelie bin store at the Hampton Court Flower Show last year.

Log store - unplanted

I explained to a carpenter friend what I wanted and after much head-scratching, he came up with the following very smart structure, with a hidden gutter and lined with roofing felt and three long flat trays for planting. I lined each tray with an old towel to act as the substrate and hopefully stop the drainage holes from clogging, then filled with a mix of equal parts John Innes No. 3 compost, grit sand and horticultural grit. Finally came my favourite part, the planting: lots of thymes, sedums, sempervivums, small bulbs, phlox, lithodora, saxifrage, geranium, erodium and a gorgeous deep red Primula Auricula. Looking forward to seeing how it does over the coming season! Dusk was falling as I took the final pictures, but I’m hoping for great things.

Log store planted - from front

Log store planted at dusk

Today saw me getting the propagator out from its winter storage in the garage and planting seeds, which always makes it feel like Spring has arrived. I sowed aubergines (Bonica, which were superb last year, and a mixed pack of Asian and European varieties, all different colours), Jalapeno chillis, Romano peppers, purple globe artichokes, parsley, basil, three kind of leeks, Lobelia Cambridge Blue and Achillea Summer Berries. Amazing to think how much fabulous produce will result from those tiny little seeds….

 

Propagator

Let the 2016 season commence!

Aubergenius!

Bougainvillea in MairenaI’m newly returned from a fabulous yoga holiday in the Spanish Alpujarra mountains, where we practised yoga in the olive and orange groves to the sound of cicadas and golden orioles – bliss! The food on offer was vegetarian, as befits a yoga holiday, and cooked by local Spanish ladies from the hill village of Mairena – all absolutely delicious. Back home, my allotment and garden are overflowing with produce and I find I’m inclined to continue the vegetarian diet – why eat meat when there’s so much produce to experiment with?

Much to my surprise, my aubergine plants, grown from seed (Bonica), had two huge aubergines perfect for picking the week I arrived back – much better than the grafted specimens I bought at great expense last year. We’d had a delicious aubergine recipe at Las Chimeneas whilst I was away, subsequently demonstrated in a fascinating local cookery session and we’d all been issued with the recipe, so this seemed the perfect opportunity to try my Spanish cookery skills! My version is slightly adapted from the original to suit the contents of my kitchen, but I’m assured that Soledad, the cook, changes it every time too!

Aubergine plant July 2015Walnut-stuffed Aubergines (Berenjenas rellenas) – serves 2

1 large aubergine

1 onion, chopped

2 cloves garlic

50g walnuts

2 large tomatoes

1 tbsp tomato purée

100g grated Manchego or Cheddar cheese

Large handful of basil leaves

Seasoning

Olive oil

1 egg, beaten

Cut the aubergines in half lengthways, leaving the stalk end intact, brush the cut sides with olive oil and bake them on a baking tray in the oven for 20-25 minutes at 180°C, Gas 5, until soft. Allow to cool, then scoop out the soft flesh and put to one side, leaving the skins intact.

Meanwhile, fry the chopped onion and garlic until soft in the olive oil. Place the walnuts on a tray and cook in the oven for 5-7 minutes until starting to turn golden brown, then crush lightly in a pestle and mortar – not too fine. Grate the tomatoes (ingenious – I’d never thought of doing this, but it saves the effort of skinning them as you discard the last piece of skin!) and add to the pan with a squeeze of tomato purée (needed to compensate for the tomatoes available in the UK at this time of year compared with the flavoursome Spanish varieties… mine won’t be ready for a few weeks and hopefully will make the world of difference). Chop the aubergine flesh and add to the mixture with the crushed walnuts, chopped basil and half the grated cheese, then season well. Remove from the heat and stir in the beaten egg.

Fill the mixture back into the aubergine skins, sprinkle with the remaining cheese, and return to the oven for 20 minutes to cook through and brown.

Serve with a salad and rice, or just with griddled courgettes served with chopped mint and lime, as I did. Enjoy!

Stuffed auberginesAnother old favourite of mine is Aubergine Parmigiana, based on a recipe in an ancient M&S cookbook dating back to the early 80’s! Aubergines were doubtless very new-fangled in the UK in those days, usually seen in moussaka, but this recipe has always been one of my stalwarts.

Aubergine Parmigiana – serves 2-3

1 large aubergine – mine weighed 400g! – or 2 small

Olive oil

1 onion, chopped

1 clove garlic, chopped

1 large can chopped tomatoes

1 tsp sugar

1 tbsp tomato purée

Handful of basil leaves, chopped

Seasoning

1 small carton natural yogurt

50g Parmesan cheese, finely grated

50g breadcrumbs

Slice the aubergines crosswise and place the slices on a foil-lined grill pan, then brush with olive oil. Grill until starting to brown, then turn over with kitchen tongs, brush the other side with oil and grill again. Transfer to a tray lined with kitchen paper to absorb any excess oil and repeat with the remaining aubergine slices.

Meanwhile, fry the onion and garlic in olive oil until soft, then add the tomatoes, tomato purée, sugar, chopped basil and seasoning. Cook for 15 minutes or so until well blended.

Place half the aubergine slices on the bottom of a rectangular gratin dish and cover with half the tomato sauce and half the yogurt. Repeat these layers, then top with the cheese and breadcrumbs, mixed together. Cook in a hot oven, 180°C, Gas 5 for 30 minutes until golden brown and bubbling. Serve with salad. Any leftover heats up well for lunch the next day.

Aubergine Parmigiana on plateMy final recipe is based on a delicious dish I had in the famous El Pimpi tapas bar just round the corner from the Picasso Museum in Malaga. My companion and I sat at the bar in traditional fashion and had the most delicious selection of tapas: berenjenas con miel de caña, tortilla and a mixed salad – food fit for the gods! These translate as aubergines with sugar cane syrup – or molasses, I suppose. I nearly gave it a miss as I can’t stand honey (miel), but someone had kindly explained that this was sugar cane “honey” – no bees involved! I used pomegranate molasses, but you could probably use maple syrup instead.

Fried aubergines with molasses syrup (berenjenas con miel de caña) – serves 2-3

Fried aubergines

1 large Aubergine

  seasoning

   100g plain flour

   200 ml olive oil

   miel de caña (or pomegranate molasses/maple syrup)

Slice the aubergine into 1 – ½ cm slices. Place the slices on a baking tray and lightly salt on both sides. Leave for at least 30 mins to an hour to draw out the moisture, then rinse and pat dry with kitchen roll. (I don’t usually think this “disgorging” process is necessary with modern breeds of aubergine, which aren’t bitter, but for this recipe it seems like a good idea to ensure the flour sticks).

Heat the oil in a large frying pan over a medium heat. Tip the flour onto a large plate and season with salt and pepper. Coat the aubergine slices in the flour and press down, turn over with tongs and coat the other side.

When the oil is hot (it should sizzle when you put the slices in), lift the slices with tongs, shaking off the excess flour, and place in the oil. Cook for about a minute on one side until golden brown and then turn over with the tongs and do the same on the other side. When cooked on both sides remove to some kitchen roll to drain. Continue until all the aubergine is cooked.

Arrange the slices overlapping in one layer on a large serving dish/platter and drizzle generously with the molasses. Serve immediately with extra molasses/syrup on the table.

A sublime and quite unexpected combination! Las Chimeneas door