Tag Archives: Pudding

Rhubarb rules – OK?

Blossom

This time of year used to be known as the hungry gap because of the dearth of fresh produce available in the garden. I’ve just lifted the last of my leeks and (now very fibrous) parsnips, and the purple-sprouting broccoli, which has been incredibly prolific this year, is going to flower faster than I can harvest and eat it. The asparagus is just showing, but won’t be ready for a week or so yet – especially if we don’t have any much-needed rain! But there’s one crop you can always rely on in an English garden in the springtime: good old rhubarb.

Both my early and late varieties are now in full swing, giving me ample pickings for pies and other desserts several times a week – and plenty to give away to family and friends too, of course. There are so many ways to ring the changes with rhubarb, other than the ubiquitous compotes, crumbles, pies and fools, and I make it a personal challenge to experiment with new recipes each season. I’ve been trying for some time to recreate the delicious Swiss rhubarb tart, or Rhabarberwähe, I tasted in Basel on my year abroad, so this year I finally tracked down some authentic Swiss recipes and experimented: result! By combining a couple of the recipes I unearthed (see here for the originals: Rhabarberwähe and again here – only in German, I’m afraid, I made a tart that closely resembled my Proustian memories. It’s not dissimilar to my favourite rhubarb shortbread recipe, but creamier, with added double cream, although one of the original recipes I found used quark – if you can lay your hands on the proper full-fat version, rather than its poor relative, the 0% fat offering which is often all that’s available in UK supermarkets. I imagine crème fraîche would work just as well. I used a shortcrust pastry tart case in my experiment as I had one lying around (as you do), but a sweet shortcrust pastry would be even better – and more authentic. I halved the recipe for my trial, but this is the full quantity – just halve everything for a smaller tart.

Swiss Rhubarb Tart – serves 6

Rhabarberwahe

Sweet pastry:
5oz plain flour
1 tsp baking powder
1oz caster sugar
pinch salt
2 tsp milk
2 1/2 oz butter
1/2 beaten egg

Filling:
Generous 1lb rhubarb (5 or 6 stalks), trimmed and chopped into 1/2″ chunks
3 tbsp ground almonds
2 tbsp demerara sugar
2 eggs, beaten
150 ml double cream (or quark)
1 tsp vanilla extract
4 tbsp vanilla sugar

First, make your pastry case: sift flour, salt and baking powder into a bowl. Stir in sugar, egg and milk until evenly mixed, then work in butter (I find it easier if you grate it from cold) using fingers. Knead lightly to form a smooth dough, then chill in fridge for 30 mins. Do not leave too long, as it will set really hard and be impossible to roll!

When chilled, roll out on a floured surface (it will be very fragile, but can be patched if necessary!). Line a 9″ tart tin, then bake blind at 200°C/Gas 6 for 10 mins, then remove foil and beans and cook for another 5 mins until just set and golden.

For the filling: sprinkle the ground almonds over the base of the part-baked tart case, then scatter the rhubarb pieces on top and sprinkle with sugar. Return the tart to the oven for 15-20 minutes until the rhubarb starts to soften.

In a separate bowl, combine the beaten eggs, cream (or quark), vanilla sugar (you could just use caster here if that’s all you have) and vanilla extract, then pour over the part-baked rhubarb in the tart. Return the oven and bake for 20-25 mins until just set. Leave to cool and dust with icing sugar to serve – so good.

Another rhubarb-based pudding I discovered this year came originally from the BBC Good Food magazine calendar, often an excellent source of inspiration, if only as the pictures tantalise me every morning as I walk past! This is a posh take on a bread and butter pudding, and very comforting and delicious it is too. Again, I halved the ingredients and it still lasted several meals – warms up beautifully in the microwave too.

Rhubarb & Ricotta Brioche Pudding – serves 8

Rhubarb brioche pudding uncooked

500g rhubarb, trimmed and chopped into 3cm pieces
150g caster sugar
300ml whole milk
300m double cream
1 tsp vanilla extract
3 large eggs, plus 1 egg yolk (I just used 2 eggs when halving the mix)
250g brioche, thickly sliced
35g butter
200g ricotta
25g icing sugar
zest of one lemon
zest of one orange

Heat 100 ml water in a small pan and add 50 g of the caster sugar. Bring to the boil, then add the rhubarb. Simmer for a couple of minutes, then lift out with a slotted spoon and arrange on a single layer on a tray or plate. Set aside to cool.

Put the milk and cream in a large pan and bring to the boil, than add the vanilla. Beat the eggs, extra yolk and remaining sugar in a large bowl, then pour over the warm cream and milk mixture. Set the oven to 160°C fan or Gas 4.

Slice the bread and butter, then spread the ricotta thickly on top of the buttered bread. Cut into triangles. Sprinkle the bread with the citrus zest, then layer the slices with the rhubarb in a large 20 x 30cm baking dish – a lasagne-type dish is perfect. Pour over the egg and cream mix and leave to stand for 30 minutes (this makes the end result lighter).

Place the dish in a large roasting tin and pour boiling water to come halfway up the sides of the baking dish. Bake for 45-50 mins until puffy, set on top and golden. Remove from the oven, but leave to cool in the dish for about 10 minutes before serving.

Dust with icing sugar and serve with pouring cream or crème fraîche for a lusciously lovely spring treat.

rhubarb brioche pud cooked

My final variation on a rhubarb theme is an adaptation of a cake I usually make in September with my plum harvest: plum and almond cake, equally good as a dessert or a cake with tea. I do a different rhubarb upside-down cake, where the fruit is all piled on haphazardly, but this was inspired by a colleague on the Foodie Translators’ group on Facebook, who posted a picture of a rectangular rhubarb tart with the rhubarb immaculately laid out in a chequerbord design. Very smart.

Rhubarb Lattice Cake – serves 8

Rhubarb lattice cake

9 1/2oz caster sugar
7oz butter
400g rhubarb, trimmed and cut into equal 4cm lengths
2 large eggs, beaten
1 tsp vanilla extract
3 1/2oz self-raising flour, sifted
1 tsp baking powder
3 1/2 oz ground almonds
1 tsp cinnamon
Grated rind of one orange
2 tbsp fresh orange juice
2 tbsp milk

Grease and line an 8″ solid-bottomed cake tin with baking parchment – I use a heavy tarte tatin tin.

Put 4 1/2oz sugar and 3fl oz water in a small pan and simmer gently until the sugar dissolves. Increase the heat and cook to a golden caramel colour, watching like a hawk so that it doesn’t burn! Remove from the heat and add 2oz butter, stirring well. Pour into the prepared cake tin and place the rhubarb pieces on top in a neat lattice pattern. If you use a round tin, as I did, you’ll need to trim the outside pieces as you go to fit the tin.

Beat the remaining butter and sugar in a large bowl until light and fluffy, then gradually mix in the beaten eggs and vanilla extract. Add 1-2 tbsp flour if it shows signs of curdling. Then fold in the dry ingredients and orange zest, alternating with the milk and orange juice.

Spoon the mixture onto the plums and bake for 45-50 minutes at 160°C / Gas 4 until golden brown, spongy to the touch and a skewer comes out clean.
Cool for a few minutes, then, while still warm, run a knife round the edge of the cake, place a large plate on top of the tin and firmly but gently turn the whole plate and tin upside down. Shake a little and the cake should just turn out of the tin onto the plate. Remove the parchemnt to serve.

Serve warm with cream or crème fraiche for a delicious dessert or cold as cake – delicious either way! You could also add chopped stem ginger and 1 tsp ground ginger instead of the cinnamon in the sponge, substituting 2 tbsp stem ginger syrup for the orange juice.

Leo watching bluebells Tapsells 2019

 

Advertisements

It’s a chill wind…

Kale

It’s been bitterly cold outside today, so apart from the requisite two daily dog walks, and a brief visit to the allotment to reinstate my brassica frame and harvest some leeks, parsley, calabrese and Cavolo Nero, it’s been a day for hibernating inside in front of a roaring log fire. The frame had blown down again in last week’s strong winds, along with several front panels of my allotment shed, so it was a good thing I was accompanied by my younger son, who took it upon himself to screw them back into place. Otherwise, I might very well have discovered the whole shed missing next time I go up! As it was, there was a large piece of wood lying at the shed door, which definitely wasn’t mine and must have blown from someone else’s plot. The joys of an exposed site… but a small price to pay for tranquillity and spectacular country views, I suppose.

I did manage to do my annual New Year’s Day plant survey earlier in the week, but the wet weather meant that there were only 11 plants in flower this year: a couple of primroses, hellebores foetidus and Party Frock, chaenomeles Crimson & Gold, viburnum bodnantense Charles Lamont and daphnes aureomarginata, mezereum alba and bholua Jacqueline Postill, rose Frilly Cuff (a new addition last autumn) and a deep pink heather. However, the snowdrops are growing by the day with all the rain and their first buds should soon be out. A decidedly cheering thought.

Other than cutting back last year’s hellebore foliage, most of which has now started to fan out from the centre to better show off the emerging flower buds, as if reminding me that it’s time for the chop, there really isn’t much to tempt me out into the garden at this time of year. Even the compost bins, still stocked by a weekly bag of vegetable waste from the kitchen, decay at a slower rate at this time of year. The hellebore leaves don’t go into the garden compost, of course, as some of them show signs of hellebore leaf spot, a fungal disease I definitely don’t want to perpetuate from one year to the next. I did cut down last year’s dead and strawlike flower spikes on my vigorous valerian (centranthus ruber) plants too, though, revealing the lovely new growth waiting beneath.

Seeds Jan 2018

One thing I did do yesterday was visit my local garden centre, where I snapped up some real bargains, not only in half-price seeds – always worth looking at this time of year – but half-price organic slug pellets and tomato food too. A substantial saving when you add it all up, and these are all things I will definitely get through when the gardening year gets going in earnest.

Back in the warmth, this was an evening for an old-fashioned Beef & Guinness casserole with herby dumplings, followed by that old favourite, pineapple upside-down pudding & custard. Comfort food par excellence.

Pineapple Upside-Down Pudding – serves 6

 

Pineapple upsidedown_cropped

1 large tin pineapple slices in juice, drained
50g glacé cherries, halved
2-3 tbsp golden syrup
125g caster sugar
125g butter
125g self-raising flour, sifted
1 tsp baking powder
2 eggs, beaten
1 tsp vanilla extract

Pre-heat the oven to 160ºC, Gas 4. Grease a 20cm cake tin – I like to use a tarte tatin tin for this, but any deep cake tin will do. Spoon the golden syrup into the bottom of the tin and spread out to cover completely. Arrange the pineapple slices on the bottom of the dish; you may not need them all, but fit in what you can. Arrange the cherries decoratively around the pineapple slices.

Place the remaining ingredients in a medium bowl and whisk until light and fluffy. Spoon onto the pineapple and spread out evenly to cover. Bake at 160ºC, Gas 4 for 45 minutes until golden brown and firm to the touch. Serve warm with fresh custard or pouring cream.

Apple watch

The apple season has been unusually protracted this year, starting as it did in late July/early August with the shiny red Katy apples and now in full flow with the main crops ready to be harvested for storage: Bramleys and an unidentified, but delicious Cox hybrid in my case. I’ve been eating windfalls for months, but this weekend is on my calendar as apple harvest time – if the weather decides to play ball! I’ve been away or otherwise occupied so much recently, and am going away for work again next week, so this weekend is really my last chance before the winter weather sets in and the prospect of frost rears its ugly head.

After a delightful couple of days here in the South-East with glorious autumn sunshine and a soft breeze – combined of course with a full workload and no time to go outside and play – Saturday morning dawned wet and gloomy: not the ideal weather to cut the long overdue lawn and harvest my apples…. Fortunately, tomorrow’s forecast looks better, so I abandoned all hope of a day catching up in the garden/allotment and spent a thoroughly enjoyable afternoon pootling around in the kitchen, baking instead – good for the soul :-).

I haven’t had much time to bake since getting back from holiday, so a good opportunity to restock the cake tins (and freezer). My younger son is dog-sitting next week while I’m away; heaven forbid that I should leave him with no cake! Today’s session included spiced apple shortbread, hazelnut maple biscuits (courtesy of Nigel Slater’s Kitchen Diaries III, and a brace of ginger cakes, including one for the freezer. I also made a mocha ice cream and a good, old-fashioned apple crumble for tonight’s dessert. My favourite kind of afternoon….

I also wanted to share two other apple recipes I’ve made recently in this most apple-centric season: a walnut apple galette and a fragrant Apfelkuchen, a yeasted cake topped with sliced and spiced apples. The galette is from an ancient M&S Seasonal Freezer cookbook I’ve had since the year dot: Leo the labrador (6 today!) chewed it indiscriminately during his puppyhood, so it now has no front cover and rather mangled edges, but I haven’t the heart to throw it away. As for the apple cake, it’s based on a Nigella recipe from her delightful Domestic Goddess book, but with lots more fruit following a discussion with German colleagues in the Foodie Translator group on Facebook. Definitely one to make for breakfast or brunch when you have a house full of guests as it makes a rather large cake.

Walnut Apple Galette – serves 8

Walnut galette

3oz walnut pieces
3oz butter
2oz soft brown sugar
4oz plain flour, sifted
2-3 large cooking apples
Juice of half a lemon
2oz sultanas
1/2 tsp mixed spice (or cinnamon)
1-2 tbsp sugar (or to taste, depending on the sweetness of your apples)
1/4 pt double cream
3-4 tbsp natural yogurt
Icing sugar, sifted (to serve)

Grease two baking sheets and pre-heat the oven to 180°C, 375°F or gas mark 5.

Grind the walnuts to a coarse powder in a food processor, then add the sugar, butter and flour, and process until it comes together to make a firm dough. Divide the dough in half and roll out each half on a piece of floured baking parchment until you have an approximate disc shape measuring at least 8″ in diameter. Then mark a disc shape on the rolled dough using the base of an 8″ cake tin. Place a greased baking sheet on top of the shortbread disc and carefully flip it over using the paper at the sides to hold it in place. Remove the paper and repeat with the second half of dough and the second baking sheet. Bake in the pre-heated oven for 15 minutes or until golden. Remove from the oven and cut one of the shortbread discs into eight segments while still warm (it will crack if you try to do it when it has cooled!). Leave to cool on the trays.

While the shortbread is cooking, prepare the filling. Peel, core and slice the cooking apples and put in a pan with 2 tbsp water and a dash of lemon juice to prevent the apples going brown. Add the sugar to taste and the mixed spice or cinnamon. When the apples are soft and fluffy, add the sultanas and leave to cool.

When ready to assemble, whip the cream until soft peaks form, then whip in the natural yogurt (or you can just use cream if you prefer – I like the lighter and tangier effect with added yogurt). Place the unsegmented base on a serving plate and spread half the cream on top. Spoon on a generous layer of the apple mixture, then spread the remaining cream and yogurt mix on top. Arrange the shortbread segments on top and dust with icing sugar. This softens the longer you leave it in the fridge, so if you want to enjoy the contrast between the crispness of the shortbread and the soft billowing layers of cream and apple, don’t assemble too long before eating! That said, I adore it in its slightly softer state the following day too: the flavours just seem to meld superbly….

Apfelkuchen – serves 8-10

350g strong bread flour
1 tsp dried yeast (I use Dove’s Farm)
1/2 tsp salt
50g caster sugar
200ml milk
1 medium egg, beaten
25g butter

1 egg, beaten
1 tbsp cream (or crème fraiche)
7-8 eating apples (I used Katy, but any crisp dessert apple will work beautifully)
Juice of 1/2 lemon (or lime)
1 tbsp demerara or caster sugar
Fresh nutmeg, grated
1/2 tsp cinnamon or allspice
Handful flaked almonds

I make my bread dough in a breadmaker, but you can do it by hand if you prefer. For the breadmaker method, just put the first seven ingredients in the breadmaker and prepare the dough using the dough setting. My machine (Panasonic) takes 2 hours and 20 minutes for dough, but other machines may differ. I tend to make the dough in the evening and then leave in the fridge, covered, in a bowl overnight for a long, slow second prove.

The following morning, knock down the dough on a floured surface, then press into a greased 20 x 30 cm Swiss roll tin or roasting tin. It will take some pressing to make it expand to fit the tin, so be patient – it will get there in the end! Then set aside in a warm place to prove again while you prepare the filling. I find this takes up to one hour in a warm kitchen; if you’re lucky enough to have a proving drawer or an airing cupboard, you may get away with less.

Peel and core the apples, then cut into slices, coating in lemon juice to prevent browning as you work. Place in a bowl with the sugar, cinnamon or allspice and toss to mix evenly. Pre-heat the oven to 180°C, 375°F or gas mark 5.

In a small bowl, mix the beaten egg with 1 tbsp cream and grate in some fresh nutmeg. Then brush this mixture over the proved dough. Finally arrange the apple slices neatly in rows on top of the dough and sprinkle with flaked almonds. Bake in the pre-heated oven for 30 minutes until the fruit is tender and starting to turn golden brown. Dust with icing sugar and serve warm in chunky slices with a beatific smile. My German colleagues suggested lashings of whipped cream – but even I draw the line at whipped cream for breakfast!

Currant Favourites

Currants galore

There’s a time of year when everything seems to come ready at once – everything in the soft fruit department, that is. Just as the raspberries were coming fast and furious, all the currants – red, white and black – AND the gooseberries suddenly reached peak ripeness and demanded to be picked and eaten. Cue many hours of harvesting and bowls of fruit borne home for freezing/processing, eating just as they are. A boon, really, but it is also a bit daunting to have so much in one go! Then , just as quickly as they come, you go away for a weekend (my future daughter-in-law’s hen weekend no less!) and come back to bushes stripped clean. I don’t know how the blackbirds do it, but they seem to find a way under the nets every year. Fortunately, I’d picked the majority by then, so I don’t mind sharing some of my bounty with the allotment wildlife.

What to do with all this produce? The usual suspects of jam and freezer, of course, but I also experimented this year with a couple of recipes I’ve been meaning to try for a long time. My younger son and his girlfriend are staying this month, between lets, so a great excuse to cook more elaborate dishes than I’d normally do for myself.

Blackcurrants are one of my favourite soft fruits and rather than stick to the standard pies, crumbles and fools, I had a couple of interesting recipes on my list: Nigel Slater’s blackcurrant trifle and a delicious-sounding blackcurrant & liquorice sorbet that took me right back to the sweet shops of my childhood. You can also make it with jostaberries if you have any – they tend to crop slightly later in the season than blackcurrants, but taste very similar.

Blackcurrant Trifle – serves 8

Blackcurrant trifle

500g blackcurrants
3 tbsp caster sugar
4 tbsp water
250g sponge cake (I used half a Victoria sponge I happened to have in the freezer, but you could use trifle sponges or bought cake)
100g amaretti biscuits
2 tbsp caster sugar
1 large egg, separated
vanilla extract, 1/2 tsp
250g mascarpone cheese
300ml double cream
2-3 amaretti biscuits, crumbled, to garnish

Strig the currants and put in a pan with 3 tbsp caster sugar (or to taste) and the water. Cook gently for 7-10 minutes until soft and juicy. Remove from the heat.

Break the sponge into pieces and put into a trifle dish with the amaretti biscuits. Spoon the hot blackcurrants over the base and leave to cool.

Put the egg yolk and sugar into a bowl and mix, then stir in the mascarpone and vanilla. In a separate bowl, whisk the cream until it forms soft swirls, then fold lightly into the mascarpone mix. Finally whisk the egg white until it forms stiff peaks and fold that into the cream mixture.

Spoon the mascarpone custard over the cool blackcurrant base and refrigerate for a few hours before serving. Decorate with crumbled amaretti biscuits for added crunch.

Blackcurrant & Liquorice Sorbet

Blackcurrant and liquorice sorbet

200g granulated sugar
200ml water
450g blackcurrants
Juice of 1 lemon
25ml aniseed liqueur (I used Marie Brizard, but ouzo or pastis would work too – or leave it out if you prefer)
2 tsp liquorice powder (I ordered this online, but specialist Asian shops might stock it too)
1 egg white

Dissolve the granulated sugar in the water over a low heat and cook for 5 minutes or so. Stir in the liquorice powder. Leave to cool and form a sugar syrup.

Strig the blackcurrants (no need to remove all the stalks as they will be sieved afterwards) and put in a small pan with the lemon juice. Cook gently for 5 -10 minutes until soft. Add the aniseed liqueur. Purée the fruit mixture in a liquidiser with the sugar syrup, then press through a sieve.

Transfer to an ice cream maker and churn for 20 minutes, then fold in the stiffly whipped egg white for the last 20 minutes. (Alternatively, fold in the egg white straightaway and freeze in a container for 1-2 hours, whizz again in a food processor and return to the freezer until set.) The alcohol gives the sorbet a lovely texture and means it can be served virtually straight from the freezer. Enjoy!

 

 

 

 

 

New Year Feasts II – Desserts!

desserts-new-year-2016

Apologies for posting in quick succession, but I wanted to note down the new desserts I tried for my New Year family party before I forget my adaptations. My sweet tooth will have become only too apparent by now, and a get-together is always an ideal opportunity to try new pudding recipes. Once again, one of my New Year desserts was adapted from a recipe in the Christmas BBC Good Food magazine, whilst the other was originally a Nigel Slater recipe from his first Kitchen Diaries book, one of the most well-thumbed books on my kitchen bookshelves, but with added blackcurrant compote.

The Good Food recipe is a variation on the ever-popular chocolate roulade theme. I already have a favourite chocolate roulade recipe I’ve cooked for years, but this recipe used more eggs, so served more, and sounded intriguing, so I thought I’d give it a go. Roulades are always useful when you have gluten-intolerant guests as they often don’t contain flour. My original recipe (to serve 8) simply uses 4 eggs, separated, 150g plain chocolate and 125g caster sugar – very much like a cooked chocolate mousse and delicious with it! I serve it filled with a mixture of whipped cream and natural yogurt, accompanied by a childishly simple apricot & ginger sauce made by whizzing the contents of a can of apricots in natural juice with a cube of fresh root ginger and the juice of a lemon. Yum! The new recipe (adapted from the Good Food recipe, but not identical – see here if you want to try the original) also incorporates ground almonds and was equally delicious, although the basic method is the same – see what you think:

Chocolate, Coconut & Passion Fruit Roulade – serves 10-12

chocolate-coconut-passion-fruit-roulade

150g dark chocolate
6 large eggs, separated
170g caster sugar
25g cocoa powder
25g ground almonds
350ml double cream
150ml natural yogurt2-3 tbsp Malibu
50g icing sugar
Caster sugar to sprinkle
3 ripe passion fruit, juice and seeds
50g coconut flakes, toasted

Heat oven to 160°C, Gas 4. Grease a 30cm x 20cm Swiss roll tin and line with baking parchment, then grease the baking parchment.

Break the chocolate into pieces and melt in the microwave in short bursts, or over a pan of simmering water if you prefer. Set aside to cool. Whisk the egg whites until they form peaks – I used the Kitchen Aid for this amount of egg whites, but you could also use a hand mixer. In a separate bowl, whisk the egg yolks and caster sugar until thick and pale. Gradually fold the egg whites into the yolk mixture until combined, then sift over the cocoa and fold in the ground almonds. Finally fold in the melted chocolate. Transfer to the prepared tin and spread to the edges. Bake for 15-18 minutes until the surface is firm and the cake feels springy to the touch.

Remove from the oven and immediately cover with a piece of baking parchment and a clean, damp tea towel. Leave overnight (or as long as you can).

The next day (or later, when the roulade is completely cool), whip the cream, sifted icing sugar and Malibu in a large bowl until soft peaks form. Whisk in the yogurt. Carefully turn out the roulade onto a fresh sheet of baking parchment on which you have sprinkled caster sugar. Remove the lining paper and spread 3/4 of the cream mixture over the surface. Distribute the passion fruit flesh evenly over the cream.

Starting from the short end farthest away from you, gently but firmly roll the roulade towards you, using the baking parchment to help. It may crack a little, but don’t worry – I think this adds to the effect. Carefully transfer the rolled roulade to a serving plate using a fish slice and palette knife and then remove the baking parchment from beneath. If you can find an extra pair of hands in the form of a willing kitchen helper for this stage, do! This is a large roulade!

Place the remaining cream into a piping bag and pipe a decorative rope of cream along the centre of the roulade, then sprinkle with the toasted coconut flakes. Serve to oohs and aahs of appreciation….

For my alternative dessert, I’d consulted with the rest of the family and they’d requested a fruit cheesecake. Plenty of blackcurrants from the allotment in the freezer, so no problem there. I fancied a change from the usual uncooked cheesecake that I tend to make in the summer, and glanced through a few recipe books before I came across this Nigel Slater recipe I hadn’t tried before. I have fond memories of the cheesecake we used to buy from Palm’s in Oxford’s covered market in our student days in the early 80’s and have often tried to recreate the unctuous, yet not too claggy delight that was their trademark – so far without success, although Delia’s baked cheesecakes with fromage frais and curd cheese are good. Nigel’s recipe promised to be “one of those perfect recipes that you have been after all your life; a really fudgy, creamy filling and crisp base” – how could I resist? (And how come I’d never seen this before, in one of my cooking bibles?!)

Baked Blackcurrant Cheesecake – serves 10-12

blackcurrant-baked-cheesecake

450g blackcurrants (defrosted if frozen)
4-5 tbsp caster sugar (or to taste – I like it quite tart)
Juice of 1 orange (grate the rind first for the cheesecake)
2 tsp arrowroot
150g Hobnob biscuits, crushed (or you could use digestives)
75g butter
500g Mascarpone cheese
200g cream cheese
150g caster sugar
3 large eggs, beaten1 egg yolk
Rind of 1 orange, grated
Juice and grated rind of 1 lemon
150ml double cream, whipped
1/2 tsp vanilla extract

Cook the blackcurrants gently in a pan with the orange juice and 4-5 tbsp caster sugar until tender. Mix the arrowroot with some water in a small bowl, then mix in some of the hot blackcurrant liquid. Blend until smooth, then stir the arrowroot mixture into the blackcurrants and cook for a few minutes until the mixture thickens. Set to one side and leave to cool. You want the mixture to be quite thick so it stays on top of the finished cheesecake, but not as thick as jam – adjust by adding more orange juice when cool if necessary!

Prepare a greased 20cm loose-bottomed deep cake tin and wrap in a double thickness of foil using a single piece each time – this is to prevent water seeping into the cake when cooked in a water bath in the oven.

Melt the butter in a pan and stir in the crushed biscuits. Tip into the base of the prepared cake tin and spread out evenly. Refrigerate until set.

Put the Mascarpone, cream cheese, caster sugar, beaten eggs and the extra yolk into a large bowl, then add the grated orange and lemon rind. Beat thoroughly until well mixed, stir in the lemon juice and vanilla extract, then finally fold in the whipped cream.

Transfer to the cake tin on top of the set biscuit base and place the tin in a large roasting pan, then fill with boiling water to halfway up the side of the tin. Carefully transfer to the pre-heated oven and cook for 50 minutes at 140°C/Gas 1. Then switch off the oven and leave the cheesecake to cool in the oven. Remove the outer tin to serve, topped with the blackcurrant compote.

Palm’s, eat your heart out….

A trio of apple puds to go…

It’s that time of year again, when I’ve little time for blogging, vast amounts of urgent work (why does everything suddenly need doing before Christmas?!) and actually there’s not much doing in the garden anyway – probably just as well! It’s also the time for networking get-togethers, along with the usual festive social gatherings and this year the emphasis has been on bring-your-own affairs – a refreshing change from the overpriced and noisy Christmas lunches if you go to restaurants in the run-up to Christmas.

My default option, when asked to bring something to a party, is always a dessert, for obvious sweet-toothed reasons – and apples are often my first choice as I invariably have lots hanging from the garage rafters, just crying out to be eaten. I haven’t many dessert apples left by this stage, just a few mellow Cox types, but still plenty of Bramleys. So what to take?

My first contribution was a Toffee Apple pie, based on a Sarah Raven recipe from her lovely “Food from Family & Friends”, a great book when cooking for the masses. I’ve tweaked here and there, as ever, but it’s basically an appley take on that old favourite, the banoffee pie – and who doesn’t like that?!

Toffee Apple Pie – serves 8-12

toffee-apple-pie

150g digestive biscuits, crushed in a plastic bag with a rolling pin
75g butter, melted
1 tsp ground cinnamon
1 tin Caramel condensed milk
5-6 large Cox apples, peeled and sliced
75g butter
1 tbsp vanilla sugar
Juice and grated zest of 1 lemon
300ml double cream (or mix of cream and natural yogurt)
Grated zest of 1 orange
Toasted flaked almonds, to garnish

Stir the crushed biscuits into the melted butter, add the cinnamon, mix well, then press the crumbs into a greased 24cm loose-bottomed tart tin (mine is about 4cm deep). Chill in the fridge while you prepare the apples.

Melt the second batch of butter in a frying pan and add the sliced apples and 1 tbsp vanilla sugar. Cook until golden brown and tender. My apples are so mellow by this time of year that they fall, but if you can find apples that keep their shape, so much the better – it tastes delicious either way! Stir in the lemon juice and zest. Set to one side to cool.

Gently spread the Caramel condensed milk over the flan base, taking care not to disturb the crumbs – if you’ve left it to chill sufficiently, it should be fine. Arrange the pan-fried apples evenly over the top.

Whip the cream in a large bowl with the grated orange zest (you can use a combination of cream and yogurt for a lighter topping), then spread over the apples, covering completely. Sprinkle with the toasted flaked almonds and remove the outer ring of the tin to serve.

My second pudding choice was a trusty Tarte aux Pommes from one of my first ever cookery books, an M&S paperback by Jeni Wright called Just Desserts, dating back to the early 80s – and yes, it still comes out nearly 40 years down the line! It’s also the source of another family favourite, my profiteroles…. Forgive the Imperial measurements in this recipe – as I said, it goes back a long way (and I still think primarily in Imperial when baking!).

Tarte aux Pommes – serves 8

tarte-aux-pommes

10oz plain flour
pinch of salt
2oz vanilla sugar
1 beaten egg
3-4 tsp milk
5oz butter, diced

2-3 large cooking apples, peeled and sliced
2oz butter
4oz granulated sugar (or to taste)
1/2 tsp ground cinnamon
4 large dessert apples
Juice and zest of 2 lemons
6 tbsp light-coloured jam (I use gooseberry, but apricot or rhubarb would work well too)
1 tbsp icing sugar

Sift the flour and salt into a large mixing bowl and add the sugar, beaten egg and milk, then rub in the diced butter (you can use grated frozen butter too if preferred). Knead to form a dough, then chill for 20 minutes.

Meanwhile peel and slice the apples, then place in a large pan with the butter, granulated sugar, cinnamon and lemon zest. Cook over a gentle heat until the apples are reduced to a thick purée, stirring every so often to prevent sticking. Beat with a wooden spoon to remove any lumps. Set aside to cool.

When the pastry has chilled, roll out carefully on a floured surface to make a big enough circle to line  a greased 24cm loose-bottomed flan tin (as above). (I find I only need 2/3 of the mixture for a tart of this size, so use the remaining pastry to make a batch of mince pies.) Line the pastry case with baking parchment and baking beans and bake blind in a pre-heated oven (180-200°C) for 10 minutes. Remove the paper and beans and put it back in for another 3-4 minutes to set the base.

Reduce the oven temperature to 160°C, then spread the apple purée over the baked tart case. Peel the dessert apples, and slice into thin, even slices, sprinkling with lemon juice as you go to stop browning. Arrange the sliced dessert apples in an overlapping ring around the edge of the tart case and then either another ring in the opposite direction or fill the gap with rows of overlapping apples if, like mine, your apples are too large to achieve two rings even in a tin of this size!

Warm the jam in a bowl in the microwave or in a small pan with the juice of a lemon and one tbsp of water. Press through a sieve into another pan, add the icing sugar and cook until reduced and a glossy glaze has formed. Gently pour the glaze over the apples, covering completely.

Return to the oven for 30-35 minutes, covering the pastry edges with foil if they show signs of burning. Remove the outer tin to serve with whipped cream or crème fraiche.

My final to-go dessert was for an impromptu meal with friends last week, so basically involved throwing together a pudding with very little time and storecupboard ingredients. Hence my tried-and-tested Apple & almond pudding, a Delia stalwart from over the years, but one which never fails to please, especially if you’re cooking for gluten-free guests.

Enjoy!

fireside

 

How time flies….

bewl-sunshine-nov-2016

Oh dear, how on earth has it been over a month since I last wrote here?! A fortnight in San Francisco, stealing a march on the descent from autumn into winter, probably didn’t help, but I certainly feel as though winter has arrived with a vengeance now I’m back in the wet and windy UK. From temperatures of 22°C to just above freezing was quite some shock!

On the positive side, at least there’s not much to be done in the garden at this blustery, damp and dank time of year. I planted most of my spring bulbs and planters before I left and just had a late arrival, a bag of Orange Emperor tulips from Sarah Raven, to go in on my return. I also managed to squeeze in half an hour at the allotment on Sunday afternoon to plant out last year’s saved tulip bulbs along the front of one of my raspberry beds. I’m hoping they’ll give me a nice show of colour before the raspberries get going in earnest – but I won’t hold out any hope that I’ll be able to bring myself to cut them for the house as intended originally! They always look far too lovely in situ!

tulip-orange-emperor

The courgettes and dahlias have finally succumbed to frost, although I still managed to pick a couple of bunches of sweet peas in my first week home – unheard-of in November! Now we can look forward to the first parsnips and the leeks will come into their own, plus I can see some of the calabrese have sideshoots forming where the main stems were cut. With kale and beetroot, spinach, chard and parsley bringing up the rear, there’s plenty of green stuff to keep me going for the foreseeable future.

This weekend saw two sides of the weather divide: glorious chilly sunshine on the Saturday, followed by torrential rain and gales overnight and into Sunday morning. Cue two very different walks on the Ashdown Forest en route to my parents’ house to escape the newly laid and treated oak floor throughout the ground floor of my house as it dried.

nutley-windmill

Having had the upheaval of the new flooring all week, I hadn’t had time to bake and had made a plea to my mum for a homemade cake to take home. I hadn’t baked since my return from the US and the cupboards were looking decidedly bare! Good thing I had a freezer full of soups/casseroles, although with the microwave out of action in the conservatory, I had to be sufficiently organised to get them out in advance. Mum came up trumps (are we allowed to say that nowadays?!) with a delicious rich pineapple cake, one of my recipes from my friend Moira from way back when, in my early days as an in-house translator. It still tastes as good as it ever did – just what you fancy with a cup of Earl Grey on these cold and dark winter afternoons…

Rich Pineapple Cake

2oz chopped glacé cherries
7oz self-raising flour
8oz can crushed pineapple, drained
5oz butter
4 ½oz dark brown soft sugar
2 large eggs, beaten
12oz mixed fruit
1 tsp mixed spice
1 tbsp marmalade
Brandy to taste!

Cream butter and sugar, beat in eggs, add flour, then marmalade, mixed spice, cherries, drained pineapple and dried fruit. Stir until blended, add brandy if using, then transfer to a greased, lined loaf tin.  Cook at 150°C for 1 to 1 ¼ hrs, covering after 1 hour if it looks to be turning too brown.

Double up the mixture using a large tin of pineapple if making two cakes at once. Freezes well. Can be marzipanned and iced as a light Christmas cake.

I did manage to scramble together an easy traditional pudding for Sunday dinner when I got home to a beautifully dry oak floor. Still no furniture in the kitchen as yet, but at least I could access the basics. All-in-one sponges are a godsend when you haven’t much time and you really can’t beat a good, old-fashioned Eve’s pudding, especially when you still have a surplus of fluffy, tangy Bramley apples to use up.

Eve’s Pudding – serves 4-6

evess-pudding

40z butter, softened
4oz caster sugar
2 eggs, beaten
4oz self-raising flour, sifted
1 tsp vanilla extract

2 Bramley apples, peeled, chopped and stewed with a little water, a modicum of sugar to taste and a squeeze of lemon juice

Peel the apples, chop into a pan with a few dsp of sugar – to taste: I like it quite tangy – and a squeeze of lemon juice to prevent browning. Cook until fluffy, beat until smooth and set aside to cool. Transfer to a greased 8″ round Pyrex dish.

Place the butter, sugar, flour, beaten eggs and vanilla extract into a bowl and whisk until light and fluffy. Spoon carefully over the cool apple purée to cover.

Bake at 180°C for 1/2 hour – 40 minutes until golden brown and well-risen. Serve warm with homemade custard – or Bird’s if you must!

I use an adaptation of Delia’s “proper” custard and very good it is too. It really isn’t much trouble to make and tastes incomparably better than the powdered stuff; try it and see!

Homemade custard

150ml double cream
150ml semi-skimmed milk
3 egg yolks
1 tsp cornflour
1 1/2 tbsp vanilla sugar
1 tsp vanilla extract

Warm the milk and cream in a small pan until it just comes to the boil. Meanwhile mix together the egg yolks, cornflour, vanilla sugar and vanilla extract in a small bowl. Add the hot milk, stir well and return to the pan over a gentle heat, stirring constantly. Continue to stir until the mixture thickens, taking care that it doesn’t curdle – the addition of the cornflour should help to stabilise it.

custard