Tag Archives: drizzle cake

Baking with courgettes…

The recent unexpected late summer heat has meant that the courgettes are still going great guns. Blink, or miss a day or two of harvesting, and you have marrows to contend with! Fortunately, I love courgettes, so courgette pasta, courgette & feta pancakes and grated courgette & beetroot salad have all been on the menu this week – hardly any wonder that I turn virtually vegetarian in the summer months.

Another way of using up courgette gluts is to use them in baking. Bread and cakes with added courgette seem incredibly light and airy – and decidedly virtuous: green AND making inroads into the courgette mountain!

I first made courgette bread  a few years ago when I stumbled across a delicious-sounding recipe on Jack Monroe’s website, then called “A Girl called Jack”. The website has now been rebranded “Cooking on a bootstrap“, but the recipe remains the same – along with the intention of providing tasty food on a shoestring. I’ve adapted it slightly for use in a breadmaker, but it is fundamentally based on Jack’s original idea – and a really nice way of using up some of those courgettes. (See the original website if you want to make it the old-fashioned way.)

Courgette, Lemon & Sultana Bread

courgette, lemon and sultana bread

1 medium courgette
300g strong bread flour, plus extra to knead the dough
1 tsp dried yeast (I like Dove’s Farm)
1 tsp salt
1 tsp sugar
50g sultanas
zest and juice of 1⁄2 a lemon
1 tsp caraway seeds (optional)
Water
Poppy seeds to sprinkle

Grate the courgette finely into a large mixing bowl and set aside with a sprinkling of salt in a colander to allow some of the liquid to drain off – especially important if using juicy homegrown courgettes! Put 1 tsp dried yeast, 300g strong bread flour, salt and sugar into the breadmaker, then add the drained courgette, sultanas, lemon zest and caraway seeds if using. Add the water to the lemon juice and make up to 100-120 ml – I would tend to add the lesser amount if using homegrown veg. as they are very juicy. Set the breadmaker to dough mode – this takes 2 hrs 20 minutes in my Panasonic machine, but every machine will be different.

When the dough is ready, turn out onto a floured surface and knock down. You may need to add quite a lot of extra flour at this stage, depending on the juiciness of the courgettes. When the dough is soft, but able to be moulded without sticky fingers, pat out an oval on a greased baking sheet and leave in a warm place to prove for 30 mins – 1 hour. Sprinkle with poppy seeds if using.

Set oven to 180°C/gas 4 to preheat, then cook the proved loaf for 30 minutes. It should be golden and crisp on top, feel lightweight and sound hollow on the bottom when tapped. Leave to cool on a wire rack, then serve with butter and hunks of cheese – this is also surprisingly good toasted with jam!

My second bread recipe came about when I realised I hadn’t left myself enough time to make a yeasted dough and had people coming for lunch. A quick internet search (I find myself doing this more and more nowadays despite my many recipe books!) brought up this BBC recipe, which is amazingly good considering how quick it is – and yes, it uses up yet more courgettes! I adapted it to what I had in the fridge, as ever, but honey aficionados might like to check out the original recipe.

Courgette & Cheddar Soda Bread

Courgette and Cheddar soda bread

400g self-raising flour, plus extra for dusting
2 medium courgettes
50g rolled oats
1 tsp salt
1½ tsp bicarbonate of soda
75g mature cheddar, grated
few sprigs fresh thyme, leaves only
285ml natural yogurt
1 tbsp maple syrup
1 egg, beaten or milk, to glaze

Heat oven to 180°C fan/gas 6 and grease, then dust a baking sheet with a little flour. Coarsely grate the courgettes, then place in a clean tea towel and  squeeze out as much liquid as you can. Put the flour, oats, bicarb and 1 tsp salt in a large bowl. Add most of the cheddar (save a little for the top), thyme leaves and grated courgettes. Mix the yogurt and maple syrup, then pour into the flour mixture. Stir with a wooden spoon until the dough starts to clump together, then tip onto a work surface and knead briefly to bring all the loose bits together – try not to overwork the dough or the bread will be heavy.

Shape into a round loaf and place on the baking sheet. Brush with egg or milk and sprinkle with the remaining cheese. Use a sharp knife to score a deep cross on top of the loaf, then bake for 30-40 mins until deep golden brown. Best served warm, but leftovers will keep for 1-2 days. Delicious with soup, cheese or hummus – and makes delicious toast!

My final baking suggestion is a courgette cake. Inspired by Bake Off’s drizzle challenge this week, I fancied a courgette drizzle cake – and sure enough, my internet searches brought up a few promising candidates. I plumped for a gluten-free option (always worth experimenting before you’re expecting guests) from the Waitrose recipe site, and was amazed by the results: you would never guess this was a GF cake – sublime!

Courgette Lemon Drizzle Cake

Courgette drizzle cake

250g courgettes, coarsely grated
175g butter, softened
175g caster sugar
3 large eggs
1 tsp vanilla extract
100g ricotta
125g Doves Farm self-raising flour
85g polenta
1 tsp baking powder
1 tsp bicarbonate of soda
Finely grated juice and zest 2 lemons
Handful thyme sprigs
6-8 tbsp icing sugar

Preheat the oven to 180°C/gas 4. Grease and base-line 2 loaf tins (or one if you prefer a larger cake for a crowd – bear in mind that cakes made with fresh vegetables don’t keep as long, especially in the warm summer months. I made one to eat and one to freeze.). Put the grated courgettes into a clean tea towel and squeeze out excess juice.

Cream the butter and sugar together in a large bowl until creamy. Gradually beat in the eggs, adding a spoonful of flour if it looks as though it is starting to curdle, followed by the vanilla and ricotta. Fold in the flour, polenta, baking powder and bicarbonate of soda. Finally fold in the lemon zest, grated courgettes and thyme leaves, reserving some for decoration.

Spoon the mixture into the loaf tin/s and bake for 1 hour (large tin) or 35 mins (two tins) until risen, golden and a skewer inserted into the middle of the cake comes out clean. Leave to cool in the tin, then turn out onto a wire rack.

Mix the lemon juice with the icing sugar and a sprinkling of thyme leaves. Spoon the drizzle over the cooled cake and leave to set. Slice and serve with a cup of tea for a delectable afternoon treat.

Courgette drizzle cake_closeup

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Tray bakes – Très bon!

Thirty-minute fruit cakeOn a quiet, wet afternoon at the tail end of summer, conjuring up a quick tray bake often feels like exactly the right thing to do. Quick to make, usually with straightforward, readily available ingredients, they’re the ideal way to restock empty cake tins for afternoon tea and unexpected visitors – and your freezer too, should you so choose.

I often make my straightforward Victoria sponge mix (Delia’s classic all-in-one with 6oz SR flour, butter, caster sugar, 1 tsp baking powder and 3 large eggs – sorry, I’ve been making this for so long that it doesn’t come naturally to specify metric units!) and cook it in a deep tin (measuring approx. 30cm x 20cm x 5cm deep) at 160°C fan, Gas 4 for about 30 minutes. When cool, ice with glacé icing or spread with home-made jam and sprinkle over desiccated coconut to make quick and easy Lamingtons. In season, of course, you can add chopped chocolate to the sponge mixture, ice and decorate with mini eggs for the perfect Easter treat. The possibilities are endless.

Another of my favourite tray bakes at this time of year is a Blackberry, Lime & Elderflower Drizzle Cake that appeared some years ago in a Waitrose Kitchen magazine summer fête special. I’ve cooked quite a few of these recipes and they’re all good (see Rocky Road Flapjacks), but they do make substantial quantities, so cook for a crowd or be prepared to freeze some!

Blackberry, Lime & Elderflower Drizzle Cake

225g self-raising flour

75g polenta

250g softened butter

250g caster sugar

4 large eggs, beaten

1 tsp vanilla extract

Juice and zest of 1 lime

2 tbsp milk

150g blackberries

100ml elderflower cordial

6 tbsp granulated sugar

Juice and zest of ½ lime

Mix the first 8 ingredients in a large mixing bowl with a hand whisk until light and fluffy. Transfer to the greased and lined tin (see above), then scatter over the washed blackberries. Leave them on top of the mixture as they will inevitably sink as they cook! Bake for 30 minutes at 160°C fan, Gas 4, or until the sponge bounces back when pressed gently with a finger. Leave in the tin while you mix together the elderflower cordial, granulated sugar and juice and zest of ½ lime. Prick the cake all over with a fine skewer, then pour over the cake while it’s still hot and leave in the tin to cool completely. Slice into at least 16 – 20 squares and serve with afternoon tea and a happy grin.

This cake won’t keep more than 3-4 days because of the fresh fruit content – but it’s so delicious, that’s not normally a problem…

Another favourite tray bake when I have limited time to bake is the so-called Thirty-Minute Fruit Cake. It’s now a much-splattered cutting in my ancient recipe scrapbook, so I can’t remember where it came from originally – probably Good Housekeeping magazine. This really is child’s play to make and consists almost entirely of store cupboard ingredients. Served just warm, it’s delightful, but it keeps well in a tin for a good week if necessary.

Thirty-Minute Fruit Cake

125g softened butter

125g soft light brown sugar

Grated rind of 1 lemon (or lime)

2 large eggs

Few drops vanilla extract

150g self-raising flour

1 tsp baking powder

1 tsp mixed spice

50g glacé cherries, chopped

50g each currants, sultanas and raisins

25g desiccated coconut

25g demerara sugar

50g flaked almonds

Lemon (or lime) juice to mix as required

Grease and base line a deep 28 x 18 cm baking tin. Beat together the first eight ingredients, adding the lemon juice if necessary to create a soft dropping consistency. Then gently mix in the cherries, dried fruit and coconut.

Transfer to the prepared tin and sprinkle the top with demerara sugar and flaked almonds – I don’t actually bother to weigh these, just add what looks right, but I’m sure I must have started off with the recipe amounts back in the mists of time!

Bake at 160°C fan, Gas 4 for 25 – 30 minutes until golden brown. Slice into 16-20 bars and enjoy!

Leo and the apples