Tag Archives: curry

Here we go again…

Snow again

I had intended to do some serious spring gardening today, distributing last year’s compost, cutting back lavateras and roses, and weeding the allotment beds before the onslaught of spring, but Nature had other ideas… A bitterly cold wind and more snow from the East made gardening a rather uninviting prospect, so I’ve spent the day doing much-needed admin in the warmth of the house instead. This is clearly going to be a very late start to the gardening year! You can’t fight the elements, though.

At least my sons had managed to take down my rickety old wooden arch last weekend and erect the new, elegant Gothic arch. The climbing roses Ginger Syllabub and Bouquet d’Or have had to be cut back extremely hard, as they were intertwined in the old trellis, but fingers crossed they’ll shoot again when the growing season starts. Likewise the clematis, both late-flowering viticella varieties (Kermesina and Black Prince), were cut back in February as usual and should grow strongly once the weather warms up. I just need to wire between the uprights to give them some more support before the roses provide them with a woody framework. This was the perfect Mother’s Day treat for me: solving one of my garden problems 🙂

New arch

Back to winter today, and a chance to jot down some spicy fish recipes I’ve been meaning to share for quite some time. One, a tuna curry, is another of those store cupboard standbys that I’ve had in my repertoire for years. It came originally from a fellow translator when I worked in-house in Cheshire many moons ago and it always goes down well – and freezes well too, developing even more flavour after a spell in the cold. My sons both took it to university as part of their arsenal of easy recipes, and it’s certainly ideal hearty, yet tasty student fare. It’s one of those recipes where you can vary the vegetables and spices, but I’ll write down the basic, oh-so-easy recipe and leave the rest to you.

Tuna Curry – serves 4

1 large onion, chopped
2 cloves garlic, finely chopped
2 sticks celery, sliced
1 green or red pepper, chopped
1 can chopped tomatoes
1 cooking apple, peeled, cored and chopped
2 tbsp tomato purée
seeds from 8-10 cardamom pods, crushed
1 red chilli, finely chopped
2 tbsp ground coriander
1 tsp ground cumin
1 tsp garam masala
2 tsp sugar
seasoning
50g desiccated coconut
50g sultanas
2 160g tins tuna (drained)
chopped fresh coriander to serve

Cook the chopped vegetables in a large deep pan for one hour, stirring in the spices after 10 minutes or so once the vegetables have softened and started to turn golden. Add the chopped tomatoes, sugar and seasoning, swilling the can around with water and adding that too, to make sure the mixture doesn’t dry out. After an hour, stir in the drained tuna, coconut and sultanas and cook for another 5-10 minutes until heated through.

Serve with basmati rice, mango chutney and chopped fresh coriander to serve.

Simple, yet delicious!

My second spicy fish dish is adapted from a Sophie Grigson recipe, discovered in a magazine many years ago. While it’s called a biryani, I make no claim to its authenticity, but love the end result of a gently spiced oven-baked rice dish. I often make this with leftover rice, or indeed make twice as much rice one night, with a view to making this the following evening. Just stir in the spices with the cooked rice if you decide to follow suit, as the original recipe cooks the basmati from scratch with the turmeric and cinnamon stick.

Smoked Salmon Biryani – serves 3

Smoked salmon biryani

150g basmati rice
1 tsp ground turmeric
1 cinnamon stick
6 whole cardamom pods, seeds removed and crushed
3 tbsp rapeseed oil (or oil of your choice)
2 tsp black mustard seeds
2 large onions, chopped
2 cloves garlic, finely chopped
1 leek, sliced
1 red or green pepper, deseeded and diced
1 or 2 red chillis, finely chopped
1 tsp ground cumin
1 tsp ground coriander
100g frozen peas
250g smoked salmon, roughly chopped
juice and zest of 1 lime
1 tbsp chopped dill (or coriander or parsley!)
50g butter, diced
seasoning
halved cherry tomatoes to serve (optional)

Start by cooking the rice in boiling water with the turmeric and cinnamon stick for 8-10 minutes. Drain and set to one side.

Meanwhile cook the onions, garlic and chilli in a large frying pan, or an ovenproof shallow casserole if you have one. When the onion is starting to soften and turn golden, stir in the mustard seeds, crushed cardamom, cumin and coriander, then add the pepper and leek. Continue to cook gently for another 5 minutes or so, then stir in the frozen peas and cook for another couple of minutes. Finally stir in the smoked salmon, juice and zest of one lime, the cooked rice, and seasoning.

At this point, you can either transfer the mixture to an ovenproof casserole, or just dot the biryani with the butter in situ, cover with a lid or with foil, and transfer to an oven pre-heated to 160°C, Gas 4 for 30 minutes.

Serve with chopped dill (or coriander/parsley) and cherry tomatoes to garnish if you feel so inclined.

Roll on Spring!

Spring bulbs

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Emerald Treasure

April harvest

My haul from the allotment on Sunday was a veritable treasure trove of seasonal delights: pink rhubarb, slate green and white leeks, rich purple-sprouting broccoli, the sapphire glints of rosemary flowers and of course the emerald green of perpetual spinach and flat-leaf parsley. It certainly makes for interesting meal planning in the week ahead!

The broccoli was a delicious accompaniment to my one-pot roast chicken and roasted roots on Sunday evening, with the rest going in a delectable Italian anchovy and pine nut sauce for linguine on Monday. Rhubarb found its way into my favourite rhubarb shortbread, a cake/pudding combined with a vanilla-infused, buttery custard topping. Plenty left over for a rhubarb and orange compote later in the week too.

I couldn’t decide what to do with the spinach initially; I pondered the idea of a spinach & pea soup, but the current warm weather hardly lends itself to soup. Then I remembered a recipe I’ve cooked many a time, a spinach & mushroom korma from Nigel Slater’s Real Food: just what I fancied, light, vegetarian, yet packed full of flavour and goodness. Plus it freezes well, so I can use all the spinach I’d picked. Given that it will probably go to seed very soon – and I’ll need the bed to plant this year’s pea crops – it’s no hardship to use as much as I can! As ever, I’ve tweaked the recipe to suit the contents of my fridge, but the principle is the same.

Spinach & Mushroom Korma – serves 2-3

Spinach and mushroom korma

25g butter
1 tbsp olive oil
1 clove garlic, finely chopped
1 tbsp fresh (or frozen) root ginger, grated
1/2 tsp ground cumin
1/2 tsp turmeric
1/2 green chilli, finely chopped (or to taste)
8 cardamom pods, seeds scraped out and crushed
1 cinnamon stick
1 bay leaf
250-300g large mushrooms
25-50g hazelnuts, toasted and chopped (or you can use toasted cashews)
200g spinach, thick stalks removed
Handful wild garlic leaves (if in season – optional!)
2 tbsp sultanas
100ml sour cream
2 tbsp crème fraiche or natural yogurt
Seasoning
Fresh coriander (or parsley) to serve

Melt the butter and oil in a pan and cook the sliced onions, chopped garlic, grated ginger and finely chopped chilli for about 5 minutes until softened. Stir in the spices and bay leaf and cook for a further 2-3 minutes. Chop the mushrooms into chunks and add to the onion mixture, then cook for another couple of minutes. Then add the chopped hazelnuts (or cashews), sultanas and 150ml water, bring to the boil, cover with a lid and simmer for 15 minutes over a low heat.

Wash the spinach and wild garlic thoroughly, removing any thick stalks, drain, then chop roughly – it will look a huge mound! When the 15 minutes are up, add the chopped spinach and garlic – you may need to do this in several stages, but it will quickly reduce in volume as it wilts. Cook down for a few minutes, then season well and stir in the sour cream and crème fraiche/yogurt, warming gently without boiling to prevent curdling. Remove the bay leaf and cinnamon stick before plating.

Finally, garnish with fresh coriander or parsley, depending what you have to hand, and serve with rice. The flavours seem to meld even more after freezing, as is often the case.

Poppy and Leo in the garlic at Snape
Perfect day for picking wild garlic

 

Checking your pulse(s): lentils

lentils-628468_960_720

Dried pulses, and especially lentils, are an essential part of my store cupboard and really come into their own in the winter months, when fresh vegetables aren’t quite as vibrant or plentiful. I love lentil soups, such as Tomato & Lentil, or Carrot & Lentil, and often throw a handful of lentils into chicken broth or good old vegetable soup for extra body and protein. They’re pretty cheap too – a pack of dried red lentils or beans lasts for ages and is very reasonably-priced. The more exotic Puy lentils are even more delicious, holding their shape better when cooked to a slurry with herbs and lemony flavourings as an accompaniment to smoked fish or as part of a rich and wholesome sausage casserole – perfect winter comfort food! Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall’s take on Sausage and Puy lentil casserole is particularly scrumptious, although I prefer it with dried apricots rather than prunes (shades of school dinners…).

One of my favourites is a lentil curry I came across in my first ever (Tower) slow cooker manual, over 30 years ago now. I still have the book (taped together!), but I’ve adapted the recipe to suit our growing taste for spices and added extra vegetables over the years. I still make it in my slow cooker (not quite the same one; I managed to drop the earthenware bowl and ended up buying a whole new slow cooker), but it must be 25 years old now and still going strong – and as useful as ever! Such a lovely feeling to put it on in the morning when you know you’re going out all day, then return home to a lovely hot meal and the knowledge that you don’t have to cook (much as I love it usually!). Brilliant for chilli con carne, sublime for brisket of beef or a slow-braised ham joint with cider, apples and celery…. or equally good for mulled wine, steamed puddings (especially Christmas pudding!) and crème caramel! And of course, I always use it to make my stock with the cooked chicken carcass, onion, celery, chilli, herbs, vegetable cooking water and seasoning, left over night – perfect! A friend says she pre-cooks her pulses in the slow cooker after soaking them – I haven’t tried that, I must admit, but it sounds like a great idea.

Anyway, about that lentil curry. You can adjust the chilli content to suit your own taste: the first time I served this to one of my sons’ schoolfriends when he came to dinner soon after we moved south, he maintained it was REALLY hot, yet we find it quite mild using 3 or 4 home-grown Apache chillis (seeds included). If you know you’re averse to hot spices, or you think your chillis may be very hot, adjust accordingly. It’s hard to take them out after the event!

Lentil Curry – serves 6-8

Lentil curry

Olive oil

2 onions, chopped

2 cloves garlic, finely chopped

3-4 red chillis, chopped, removing seeds if you prefer (or to taste!)

1 tsp turmeric

1 tsp ground coriander

1 tsp ground cumin

8-10 cardamom pods, seed removed and crushed

4 carrots, diced

3 sticks celery, chopped

1 red pepper, chopped

1 large apple, peeled and chopped

1 leek, sliced

12oz red lentils

2 tsp lemon juice

1 tbsp tomato purée

1 litre vegetable stock (either homemade or use a stock cube or bouillon powder in water)

Seasoning

1 handful sultanas

Heat a good glug of oil in a pan and cook the onion and garlic for about 10 mins until softened. Add chopped carrots, celery, pepper, apple and leek, then add chopped chilli, spices and stir for a few mins until well coated. Add lentils and cook for another few minutes. Add tomato purée and stock, then season well. Bring back to the boil and cook for 10 minutes before adding a handful of sultanas. Transfer to the slow cooker for 7-10 hours on Auto/Low (3-4 hours on High). Serve with chopped coriander If you have it! Otherwise parsley or baby spinach work well…) and natural yogurt with rice or Naan. Freezes beautifully!

Party Frock and snowdrops Jan 2016