Tag Archives: chocolate

Still catching up

Poppy in the shade Aug 2017_cropped

An extra day off this Bank Holiday weekend has meant that I finally feel I’m catching up with myself down at the allotment – and in the garden at home for that matter! What a difference an extra day makes, especially when the weather was kind to us for a change, and the sun shone throughout. Lawns duly mowed, fruit trees summer-pruned – well, what I can reach at any rate. Even with extendible loppers I couldn’t reach the topmost branches of one of the crab apple trees at home, and I restricted myself to just trimming the branches I could reach with secateurs in the allotment orchard. Pruning all five apple/plums in one go is too much otherwise. As it was, I took 3-4 barrowloads up to the allotment bonfire site, and there will no doubt be the same again when I finish the job with the long loppers next weekend. So satisfying 🙂

Apple juice with lunch

The harvest is coming in thick and fast now with courgettes multiplying in size overnight and windfall apples aplenty. Fresh apple juice with the red-skinned Katy apples is a must at this time of year, especially as they don’t keep. I even resorted to putting a basket on the road outside the house this morning for people to help themselves to overgrown courgettes and apples – virtually all gone this evening, thank goodness, especially as I came back from the plot with yet more apples, windfall Bramleys this time, and spare French beans.

New basket

Beetroot is another veg in plentiful supply this year. Much as I love having a bowl of cooked beetroot (baked in their skins, after which the skin peels off beautifully, and served sprinkled with balsamic vinegar) in the fridge to accompany my lunchtime cheese and crackers, I’ve been wondering how else to extend my beetroot repertoire. I’ve already made my favourite spiced beetroot & orange chutney, but wondered about a cake. I’ve made Nigel Slater’s beetroot & chocolate cake before (Tender Book I) and liked it, but my beetroot-averse daughter-in-law cold still detect its presence. This time, I thought I’d try some brownies. Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall’s recipe appealed, but contained normal flour, no good for gluten intolerance. Searching for a gluten-free version, I came across this Riverford recipe, which sounded perfect – and was! Delightfully chocolatey, fudgy and moist, I can’t detect the beetroot at all – it remains to be seen whether it will pass my daughter-in-law’s test….

Chocolate & Beetroot Brownies – makes 18

Chocolate and beetroot brownies

250g dark chocolate, chopped
200g unsalted butter, cut into cubes
1 tbsp Tia Maria or other liqueur (optional – I forgot and it still tasted divine!)
250g raw beetroot
3 eggs
A drop of vanilla extract
200g caster sugar
50g cocoa powder
50g rice flour
1 tsp gluten-free baking powder
100g ground almonds

Preheat oven to 180°C/Gas 5. Use baking parchment to line a rectangular tin, roughly 28x18cm.

Wash the raw beetroot, remove leaves and surplus roots, then wrap individually in foil  and place on a baking tray. Bake in the oven for 1 hour – or longer depending on the size of your beetroots! Leave to cool in the foil, after which the skins should peel off easily. Turn oven down to 160°C/Gas 4.

Put the chocolate and butter in a large bowl and place it over a pan of simmering water, making sure the water doesn’t touch the base of the bowl. Leave to melt, then remove from the heat and stir in the Tia Maria, if using.

Purée the cooked beetroot in a food processor. Add the eggs one at a time, followed by the vanilla and sugar, and mix until smooth.

Sift the cocoa powder, rice flour and baking powder into a bowl and stir in the ground almonds. Stir the beetroot mixture into the melted chocolate and then fold in the dry ingredients.

Pour the mixture into the prepared tin and bake in the oven for 30–35 minutes, until just firm to the touch. It’s important not to overcook brownies; a skewer inserted in the centre should come out slightly sticky. Leave to cool in the tin and then cut into squares.

Delicious with coffee, but would also be good as a dessert with whipped cream 🙂

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New Year Feasts II – Desserts!

desserts-new-year-2016

Apologies for posting in quick succession, but I wanted to note down the new desserts I tried for my New Year family party before I forget my adaptations. My sweet tooth will have become only too apparent by now, and a get-together is always an ideal opportunity to try new pudding recipes. Once again, one of my New Year desserts was adapted from a recipe in the Christmas BBC Good Food magazine, whilst the other was originally a Nigel Slater recipe from his first Kitchen Diaries book, one of the most well-thumbed books on my kitchen bookshelves, but with added blackcurrant compote.

The Good Food recipe is a variation on the ever-popular chocolate roulade theme. I already have a favourite chocolate roulade recipe I’ve cooked for years, but this recipe used more eggs, so served more, and sounded intriguing, so I thought I’d give it a go. Roulades are always useful when you have gluten-intolerant guests as they often don’t contain flour. My original recipe (to serve 8) simply uses 4 eggs, separated, 150g plain chocolate and 125g caster sugar – very much like a cooked chocolate mousse and delicious with it! I serve it filled with a mixture of whipped cream and natural yogurt, accompanied by a childishly simple apricot & ginger sauce made by whizzing the contents of a can of apricots in natural juice with a cube of fresh root ginger and the juice of a lemon. Yum! The new recipe (adapted from the Good Food recipe, but not identical – see here if you want to try the original) also incorporates ground almonds and was equally delicious, although the basic method is the same – see what you think:

Chocolate, Coconut & Passion Fruit Roulade – serves 10-12

chocolate-coconut-passion-fruit-roulade

150g dark chocolate
6 large eggs, separated
170g caster sugar
25g cocoa powder
25g ground almonds
350ml double cream
150ml natural yogurt2-3 tbsp Malibu
50g icing sugar
Caster sugar to sprinkle
3 ripe passion fruit, juice and seeds
50g coconut flakes, toasted

Heat oven to 160°C, Gas 4. Grease a 30cm x 20cm Swiss roll tin and line with baking parchment, then grease the baking parchment.

Break the chocolate into pieces and melt in the microwave in short bursts, or over a pan of simmering water if you prefer. Set aside to cool. Whisk the egg whites until they form peaks – I used the Kitchen Aid for this amount of egg whites, but you could also use a hand mixer. In a separate bowl, whisk the egg yolks and caster sugar until thick and pale. Gradually fold the egg whites into the yolk mixture until combined, then sift over the cocoa and fold in the ground almonds. Finally fold in the melted chocolate. Transfer to the prepared tin and spread to the edges. Bake for 15-18 minutes until the surface is firm and the cake feels springy to the touch.

Remove from the oven and immediately cover with a piece of baking parchment and a clean, damp tea towel. Leave overnight (or as long as you can).

The next day (or later, when the roulade is completely cool), whip the cream, sifted icing sugar and Malibu in a large bowl until soft peaks form. Whisk in the yogurt. Carefully turn out the roulade onto a fresh sheet of baking parchment on which you have sprinkled caster sugar. Remove the lining paper and spread 3/4 of the cream mixture over the surface. Distribute the passion fruit flesh evenly over the cream.

Starting from the short end farthest away from you, gently but firmly roll the roulade towards you, using the baking parchment to help. It may crack a little, but don’t worry – I think this adds to the effect. Carefully transfer the rolled roulade to a serving plate using a fish slice and palette knife and then remove the baking parchment from beneath. If you can find an extra pair of hands in the form of a willing kitchen helper for this stage, do! This is a large roulade!

Place the remaining cream into a piping bag and pipe a decorative rope of cream along the centre of the roulade, then sprinkle with the toasted coconut flakes. Serve to oohs and aahs of appreciation….

For my alternative dessert, I’d consulted with the rest of the family and they’d requested a fruit cheesecake. Plenty of blackcurrants from the allotment in the freezer, so no problem there. I fancied a change from the usual uncooked cheesecake that I tend to make in the summer, and glanced through a few recipe books before I came across this Nigel Slater recipe I hadn’t tried before. I have fond memories of the cheesecake we used to buy from Palm’s in Oxford’s covered market in our student days in the early 80’s and have often tried to recreate the unctuous, yet not too claggy delight that was their trademark – so far without success, although Delia’s baked cheesecakes with fromage frais and curd cheese are good. Nigel’s recipe promised to be “one of those perfect recipes that you have been after all your life; a really fudgy, creamy filling and crisp base” – how could I resist? (And how come I’d never seen this before, in one of my cooking bibles?!)

Baked Blackcurrant Cheesecake – serves 10-12

blackcurrant-baked-cheesecake

450g blackcurrants (defrosted if frozen)
4-5 tbsp caster sugar (or to taste – I like it quite tart)
Juice of 1 orange (grate the rind first for the cheesecake)
2 tsp arrowroot
150g Hobnob biscuits, crushed (or you could use digestives)
75g butter
500g Mascarpone cheese
200g cream cheese
150g caster sugar
3 large eggs, beaten1 egg yolk
Rind of 1 orange, grated
Juice and grated rind of 1 lemon
150ml double cream, whipped
1/2 tsp vanilla extract

Cook the blackcurrants gently in a pan with the orange juice and 4-5 tbsp caster sugar until tender. Mix the arrowroot with some water in a small bowl, then mix in some of the hot blackcurrant liquid. Blend until smooth, then stir the arrowroot mixture into the blackcurrants and cook for a few minutes until the mixture thickens. Set to one side and leave to cool. You want the mixture to be quite thick so it stays on top of the finished cheesecake, but not as thick as jam – adjust by adding more orange juice when cool if necessary!

Prepare a greased 20cm loose-bottomed deep cake tin and wrap in a double thickness of foil using a single piece each time – this is to prevent water seeping into the cake when cooked in a water bath in the oven.

Melt the butter in a pan and stir in the crushed biscuits. Tip into the base of the prepared cake tin and spread out evenly. Refrigerate until set.

Put the Mascarpone, cream cheese, caster sugar, beaten eggs and the extra yolk into a large bowl, then add the grated orange and lemon rind. Beat thoroughly until well mixed, stir in the lemon juice and vanilla extract, then finally fold in the whipped cream.

Transfer to the cake tin on top of the set biscuit base and place the tin in a large roasting pan, then fill with boiling water to halfway up the side of the tin. Carefully transfer to the pre-heated oven and cook for 50 minutes at 140°C/Gas 1. Then switch off the oven and leave the cheesecake to cool in the oven. Remove the outer tin to serve, topped with the blackcurrant compote.

Palm’s, eat your heart out….

What to do with black bananas?!

I don’t know how it is that I always seem to end up with blackened bananas in my fruit basket. I suppose at this time of year there are so many other fruits coming into season and being transformed into pudding (rhubarb, gooseberries, even strawberries) that poor old bananas, that winter standby, get forgotten. When eating them raw, I like my bananas bright yellow, just after the first tinges of green have vanished. Yes, yes, I know that they are easier to digest the riper they are, but once they start to develop brown spots, eating them as is just isn’t an option for me. Puddings and cakes are the way to go then. I’ve given recipes for my unctuous Banana cream before, but if you’re faced with REALLY black bananas, what then? Banana & cherry cupcakes are one option, but only use one banana. What if you’ve managed to overlook four bananas and can’t bear the thought of wasting them?

I was in this situation at the weekend and couldn’t find quite the recipe I had in mind, so ended up combining a couple of ideas, as is often the case. Nigel Slater’s chocolate muscovado banana cake was my starting point, but I had envisaged a dark chocolate cake, rather than chocolate chips. Here’s what I did:

Chocolate Banana Loaf
Chocolate and banana loaf

250g self-raising flour, sifted
1 tsp baking powder
125g butter
235g dark muscovado sugar
2 eggs, beaten
4 overripe bananas, peeled and roughly mashed (add a squeeze of lemon juice to prevent oxidation)
1 tsp vanilla extract
100g dark chocolate

Grease and line two loaf tins (you can make one large cake using one tin, but I split the mixture between two and freeze one). Heat the oven to 160°C fan, Gas 4.
Cream the softened butter and sugar together until light and fluffy.
Beat in the beaten egg and vanilla extract, then fold in the mashed banana.
Melt the chocolate over a pan of hot water, or in the microwave, if you prefer, and allow to cool slightly before folding into the mixture.
Fold in the flour and baking powder.
Transfer to the prepared loaf tins (or tin if you’re going for the jumbo option!).
Bake for 35 – 40 mins (or 50 mins if you’re baking the larger cake), testing with a skewer that there is no sign of uncooked cake mix.
Leave to cool in the tins, then serve and enjoy with the virtuous feeling of having transformed unprepossessing beginnings into the most delicious chocolatey cake!

Another favourite of mine is simplicity itself to prepare and happily converts the blackest of bananas into an amazingly sophisticated dessert. The recipe came originally from John Tovey’s Wicked Puddings book. You can tell how much I’ve used it by the splattered pages and the lack of spine – although that is partly due to one particular labrador in his puppy years… The joys of a full-length bookcase in the kitchen cum dogs’ bedroom!

Leo at the hunt
Brazilian Rum Banana Cream – serves 4

300ml double cream
2 tbsp caster sugar
1 tbsp coffee essence
2 tbsp dark rum
2 ripe bananas (works well with yellow ones too if that’s all you have!)
Crumbled meringue shells or amaretti biscuits to taste
Grated dark chocolate to serve

Whip the cream with the caster sugar, coffee essence, then fold in the rum.
Roughly chop the bananas and fold into the cream mixture.
For added texture, fold in crumbled meringues or crushed amaretti biscuits.
Transfer to four sundae dishes and grate dark chocolate over.
Chill before serving – and wait for compliments!

Chocolate Indulgence

Thalia II

There are times when only chocolate hits the spot. Despite the sunny weather we’ve experienced this week, it’s still pretty cold here on the Kent/Sussex border. After a mild start to the year in which some of the early daffodils bloomed in January, my beautiful Thalia daffodils are still flowering away, yet the tulips are still for the most part in bud – apart from down at the allotment, where they’re flowering away in the middle of my asparagus bed, strangely! I can’t think it’s warmer at the allotment site, as it’s on an exposed (but sunny) hillside, but perhaps they’re planted less deeply than the bulbs at home. These are the bulbs emptied from last year’s tubs, so I’m delighted they’ve flowered again – but can’t bring myself to pick them as they look so pretty!

Tulips in asparagus bed

My seedlings, sown before my recent skiing holiday, are doing well in the conservatory, but the soil is far too cold to sow straight into the ground, so I’m going to have to hold fire this weekend and hope for warmer weather by the end of the month. Tomorrow’s tasks will include pricking out and potting on the seedlings – and hoping that the conservatory window ledges are big enough to hold the many resulting individual pots! My second-early potatoes can go into the ground, though, as they’re planted sufficiently deeply to avoid any lingering cold or frost.

The house is pleasantly heated by the warmth of the sun from the conservatory during the day, but I still have the heating set to come on morning and evening to take the chill off. Even so, comfort food is definitely the order of the day and that nip in the air means that only chocolate will do! This is one of my favourite indulgent recipes, from Nigella Lawson, and probably amazingly calorific, but absolutely delicious at the same time. Think Marathon bars (or Snickers, if you insist!), only ten times nicer, and you’ll get the picture. To be made once in a while, when you’re in need of a pick-me-up, salty yet sweet at the same time. Just make sure you have plenty of guests to share it with, as it’s far too tempting to sit in a tin and ration….

Nigella’s Chocolate & Peanut Crunchie Bars

Choc and peanut bars

200g milk chocolate
100g dark chocolate
(or any combination, all dark, all milk, etc – I prefer all dark, personally)
125g butter
3 x 15ml golden syrup
250g salted peanuts (yes, salted!)
4 x 40g Crunchie bars

 1 x 25cm round cake tin or 1 baking tray approx 30 x 20 x 5cm

Line tin with foil.
Break chocolate into pieces and put in a saucepan with the butter and syrup.
Melt gently over a low heat, stirring as you go.
Tip the peanuts into a bowl and crush the Crunchie bars in their packets, then add the pieces to the bowl.
Take the melted chocolate off the heat and stir in the nuts and crushed Crunchie bars.
Mix together and tip into your lined tin, pressing down with a spatula.
Refrigerate for at least 4 hours, then cut into slices, either 24 skinny wedges if using a round tin, or 20-24 large rectangles if using a baking tray.
Enjoy!

My next indulgent recipe is a variation on a brownie that’s suitable for gluten-free visitors as it’s flourless – but definitely not for anyone looking to cut down on their sugar intake! Every now and again, though, you can surely bend the rules and treat yourself to these insanely good brownies? The recipe came from the Waitrose Kitchen magazine in the first place, along with a number of other scrumptious traybakes that I make again and again (see also Rocky Road Flapjack and Blackberry, Lime & Elderflower Drizzle Cake).

Chocolate Caramel Brownies

300g dark chocolate
250g butter
2 tsp vanilla extract
350g caster sugar
5 eggs, beaten
200g ground almonds
1 heaped tsp baking powder
1 397g can Carnation Caramel

Set oven to 160°C fan/Gas 4 and grease a 30 x 20 x 5 cm baking tin, then line with baking parchment.
Melt the dark chocolate with the butter in a large pan over a low heat.
Stir in the vanilla extract and caster sugar, then mix in the 5 beaten eggs, ground almonds and baking powder.
Tip into the prepared tin, then swirl the contents of the can of Carnation Caramel over the top with a knife.
Bake for 40-45 minutes until set on top, but still moist inside.
Leave to cool in the tin before slicing into portions – at least 16!

Here’s hoping the weather picks up soon, so we can get digging to work off all those chocolatey calories….

Nigella's choc and peanut bars with flowers

Happy Easter!

Happy Easter

Wet weather on an Easter weekend – what a surprise! Still, at least my raised beds are being rebuilt down at the allotment today, so I can look forward to getting started with the new season’s planting very soon. And it’s a perfect excuse to prepare some chocolatey treats for Easter and my weekend visitors whilst I’m stuck inside. My very kind neighbour, even more baking-mad than me, if that’s possible, has just brought round some warm home-made hot-cross buns, which I’ll look forward to with my cup of tea later.

Tina's hot-cross buns

I was thinking more along the lines of Malteser Rocky Roads for my creation. I first tasted these at an open day at my son’s university (Bath) and felt compelled to hunt down the recipe online when I got home. If their aim was to sweet-talk prospective students into going to Bath, they certainly succeeded – they are scrumptious! I think the recipe I discovered (now a much-splattered cutting in my long-suffering recipe file!) was originally a Gordon Ramsay invention – but I’ve adapted it slightly as ever by adding some dried fruit and reducing the Malteser content – mainly because I couldn’t find bags with the precise Malteser content he specifies! If you want to give the fruit a miss and use all Maltesers, I can vouch for that too….

MALTESER ROCKY ROADS

250g dark chocolate, broken into pieces

50g butter

8 digestive biscuits, crushed

120g Maltesers

55g dried cranberries (or chopped dried apricots or sultanas – your choice!)

60g mini marshmallows

Icing sugar to dust

Line a rectangular 15 cm x 30 cm baking tin with foil and grease lightly.

Melt the chocolate and butter in a large glass bowl over a pan of simmering water. Remove from heat and set aside for 10 minutes so it isn’t too hot when you add the Maltesers.

Stir the crushed biscuits, marshmallows, dried fruit and Maltesers gently into the melted and cooled chocolate until well mixed.

Transfer to the prepared tin and refrigerate until set.

Dust with icing sugar before serving.

Malteser Rocky Roads

Winter weekends in front of the fire

January and February are invariably the bleakest months of the year, with little doing on the gardening front and little inclination to brave the elements apart from the twice-daily dog walks. Far nicer to stay inside and gather together with family and friends in front of a blazing log fire! Fortunately it’s a busy few weeks for birthdays in my family, so plenty of excuses to get together and enjoy good food and convivial company.

Poppy in front of fire

A few weeks ago it was my elder son’s birthday and 14 of us gathered for a delicious lunch in an Indian restaurant at the foot of the castle (Mango Lounge – well worth a visit!), rounded off by a brisk walk in the wintery sunshine of Windsor Great Park to the raucous sound of parakeets. By the time we returned we’d worked up enough of an appetite for birthday cake and my contribution to the feast (as instructed in case the cake didn’t go round!) – chocolate amaretti bars. My son’s girlfriend is increasingly wheat-intolerant; she’s found that she feels so much better if she omits wheat from her diet and has progressed from just cutting down on bread and cake to abandoning it completely. She made the delicious birthday cake, a gooey and scrumptious chocolate mousse cake based on ground almonds, so my challenge was to produce another wheat-free treat.

Adapted from a Mary Berry recipe, the Chocolate and Amaretti Bars are wheat-free and deliciously rich, yet light at the same time, the perfect accompaniment to afternoon tea. I love amaretti crumbled into a mixture of whipped cream, natural yogurt and lemon cheese for an ultra-quick and delicious pudding, or squished in the base of a sundae dish as a speedy base for a trifle, or crushed with melted butter and brown sugar as a substitute for a fruit crumble (plums and blackberries being a particularly yummy combination). Here is Mary’s recipe, adapted ever so slightly to the contents of my store cupboard:

Chocolate and Amaretti Bars

4oz butter

2oz flaked almonds (or whole almonds chopped, if you prefer)

2oz pine nuts

3 tbsp golden syrup

7oz dark chocolate, chopped (I use Waitrose Belgian dark)

2 tsp cocoa powder

4oz dried apricots, chopped

1 bag (8oz) amaretti biscuits (I like Doria)

2 tbsp Amaretto liqueur (optional)

Line a deep rectangular cake tin with foil and grease lightly – my favourite one for tray bakes is 7” x 11” x 1”, but use the nearest you have. Put the almonds and pine nuts on an enamel plate in a hot oven (180°C, Gas 4) for 5 minutes or so until golden – watch like a hawk as they catch extremely quickly!). You could dry-fry them in a frying pan or toast them under the grill, but I find the oven method easiest and most reliable for an even golden colour. Put the butter, syrup and half the chocolate in a large bowl set over a pan of gently simmering water and allow to melt, stirring gently every so often. (Add 2 tbsp Amaretto liqueur if using – see below!) Remove from the heat, stir in the sieved cocoa, apricots and nuts, then coarsely crumble in the amaretti biscuits. Stir to mix evenly, then transfer to the prepared tin and level the surface with a spatula. Chill in the fridge overnight. The next day, melt the remaining chocolate (either over a pan of water as before, or I find it as easy to do this in the microwave, for 1-minute bursts, stirring after each session – it shouldn’t take more than 2-3 minutes in all, but don’t forget to stir otherwise it can burn in the centre!). Spread thinly over the top of the cake and leave until set. Cut into 18 bars with a sharp knife and serve – hopefully to general acclaim!

Next time I made these, I added 2 tablespoons of Amaretto liqueur to the chocolate mix after melting, before adding the rest of the ingredients, to make this even more almondy – even better! You can leave it out if you don’t want the alcohol hit, but it works really well. Good as an after-dinner treat, cut into daintier bars…

Amaretti bars