Tag Archives: autumn colours

Bananas about bananas

Colours
Magnificent Sheffield Park in Sussex

As the winter months get underway, bananas are one fruit I always have in the fruit bowl. Perfect for quick puddings when you suddenly realise you’ve nothing else planned – see my recipes for Banana cream and Brazilian rum banana cream for simple ideas, or for Toffee Bananas simply cut into chunky pieces, fry in butter until starting to brown, then add brown sugar and orange juice (desiccated coconut works well too if you’re a coconut fan), and continue cooking until you have a toffee-like sauce. Delicious with cream or ice cream. Then again, bananas simply grilled (or barbecued) in their skins, then opened up, sprinkled with sugar and a dash of rum, are pretty much food of the gods too…

Another so-simple dish if you find yourself with a surfeit of overripe bananas is to whizz them into a divinely good ice cream. This is an especially useful recipe to bear in mind over the festive period, when you suddenly realise you’ve got far too much cream nearing its sell-by date.

Easy Banana Ice Cream

4 bananas, peeled and mashed
Juice of 1 lemon (or lime)
400ml double cream
75g caster sugar

Simply put all the ingredients in a blender and whizz until smooth. Then pour into an ice cream maker and churn, or pour into a freezer container and freeze for a couple of hours, then whisk again, and keep doing that every hour until it forms ice cream. The flavour has to be tasted to be believed….

Then again, baking with bananas is another tempting option. One of my go-to recipes is the cherry and banana buns I’ve been making since time immemorial, but the other day I was fresh out of glacé cherries, so decided to experiment (very successfully) with chocolate and banana buns using the same method – a hit! The beauty of these buns is that the flavour continues to mellow over a few days – if you can keep them that long! – but they are also excellent eaten warm from the oven.

Chocolate & Banana Buns – makes 24

175g butter, softened
150g caster sugar
150g self-raising flour, sieved
25g cocoa powder, sieved
2 eggs, beaten
1 ripe banana
Lemon juice
50g dark chocolate, roughly chopped

Preheat oven to 180°C fan, Gas 5. Place 24 bun cases in bun tins. Mix butter, sugar, flour, cocoa powder and eggs together using a hand-held mixer until the mixture is light and creamy. Mash the banana in a small bowl, adding lemon juice to stop it browning. Fold the banana and chopped chocolate into the cake mix. Spoon into the cases and cook in the preheated oven for 15-20 minutes until springy to the touch. You could ice these with melted chocolate if you felt so inclined, but they really don’t need it.

This week I once again found myself with three large bananas in the fruit bowl, blacker than I like to eat them, and coincidentally I found this new recipe for a banana & cinnamon loaf in the Waitrose Weekend newspaper that I sometimes pick up when I’m shopping. Nothing ventured, nothing gained, I decided to give it a go and was very impressed with the outcome – different to my other banana cakes, but also extremely good in its own sweetly spiced way.

Banana & Cinnamon Loaf

Banana loaf_whole

125g butter, softened
125g caster sugar
2 large eggs, beaten
125g self-raising flour, sifted
1 tsp baking powder
2 ripe bananas
Juice of half a lemon

For cinnamon sugar:
25g granulated sugar
25g soft dark brown sugar
1 tsp cinnamon
generous pinch of freshly grated nutmeg

To top (optional):
1 ripe banana, sliced lengthwise, brushed with lemon juice

Preheat oven to 160°C fan, Gas 4. Place the butter, caster sugar, beaten eggs, sifted flour and baking powder in a large bowl and beat until light and fluffy. Peel and mash two of the bananas with the lemon juice until nice and soft, then fold into the cake mixture.

Mix the ingredients for the cinnamon sugar in a small bowl and set aside.

Put half of the mixture into a greased and base-lined loaf tin, then sprinkle half the cinnamon sugar evenly over the surface. Top with the remaining cake mix and sprinkle over the remaining cinnamon sugar.

If you wish you can divide the remaining banana in half lengthwise and gently place on top of the cake at this stage. Don’t press too hard – I found mine sank to the bottom of the cake, so didn’t look as pretty as I’d hoped – and the cake would still have been delicious without!

Place the tin into the oven and bake for 60-65 minutes or until golden and a skewer inserted in the cake mix (try and avoid the whole banana if using!) comes out clean. Cool in the tin before removing the cake to a wire rack. Delicious warm with cream and crème fraiche as a dessert, or equally good cold with a cup of tea – and like the previous recipe, the banana flavour just gets better and better as it matures….

Banana loaf

Let me finish with a few more pictures of this weekend’s glorious walk at Sheffield Park, a National Trust garden not far from here. I always try and go at this time of year as the autumn colours are so fabulous. My own garden can’t compete with the grandeur and magnificence of this landscaped park, but it’s good to take time out and go and enjoy other people’s creations for a change. Just stunning…

LakeAutumn walk

Lake and trees

 

 

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Thug control

Leo and lae nasturturtiums

A pleasantly mild November afternoon in the garden saw me attempting to control some garden thugs that really have got out of control: phlomis russeliana, with its spikes of tiered pale lemon flowers in summer and impressive seedheads in the winter garden, and a lavender-flowered aster with ambitions to take over the world – well, one particular flower bed at any rate! I bought it from a plant fair at Sarah Raven’s Perch Hill garden and, to be fair, the nursery owner did say it could have thuggish tendencies. Annoyingly I can’t remember the name of the species, and the label has long since disappeared. Strangely enough, I first planted it in a border with poorish clay soil, running alongside the boundary hedge between my garden and my neighbour’s, and it was remarkably well-behaved in that location. It isn’t prone to slug attack (always a good thing next to a hedge, especially when the neighbouring garden isn’t cultivated…), and gives a long-lasting splash of colour throughout autumn. However, when I relocated a clump to the richer flowerbed in front of the house, it soon gained delusions of grandeur, so much so that it was swamping everything else! My Japanese anemones didn’t see the light of day this year and basically nothing else that flowered after midsummer got a look in. It had to go!

Crazy aster

Anyway, mission duly accomplished on both counts and I’ve risked planting some of the asters where the phlomis were, under the apple tree, in the hope that competition from the tree and a shadier spot will curtail their growth – while still giving a beautiful display of lavender flowers in the autumn. The phlomis didn’t add much to that area and were self-seeded in any event. I like them on my dry and baked island bed in full sun, but that’s where they can stay.

Fabulous colours still in the garden at this tail end of the year, from the bonfire reds and oranges of Cotinus Grace, to the muted, but no less appealing shades of azaleas, asters and hydrangea Annabelle, and the deep scarlet of the crab apples….

Cotinus Grace

Moench and azalaea

Annabel autumn colour

On a more frustrating note, I’m STILL waiting for a knee operation to reconstruct my ACL following my ski injury back in March, and am feeling increasingly thwarted that I can’t do what I want to do in the garden. This weekend I had hoped to take out a large lavatera plant that had died in the prolonged heat and drought of this summer. I suspect they’re short-lived anyway and it had flowered its heart out for a good few summers. Unfortunately, try as I might, I couldn’t manage to dislodge the root, and soon realised that it was doing my knee no good at all to keep on persevering. It will have to wait for one of my sons to come home and apply a pickaxe and some brute force…

Still a successful weekend – at this time of year, a dry weekend definitely counts as a bonus 🙂

Penstemon and primrose
Penstemon Amelia Jane and some unseasonal primroses