Tag Archives: Apples

Juice is the best medicine…

Autumn walk, into the sun

It’s that time of year when everyone starts to get colds and sniffles, it’s wet outside more than it’s dry, daylight hours are limited and the gardens have started to take on their drab late autumn/winter coats as the last of the brilliant leaf colour fades. I’ve had a persistent tickly cough since returning from Crete with a heavy cold in mid-October, although my fruit and vegetable-intensive diet normally means I miss the worst of the bugs. I blame the Italian tourist sniffing and sneezing next to me on the bus down to the South coast of Crete….

When you are feeling under the weather, there are certain foods you seem to crave. I love hot blackcurrant with a squeeze of fresh lemon to soothe my throat and if you have a juicer, fresh juice goes down a treat: you can feel it doing you good and fighting all the germs as it slips down! Another dark red superfood is beetroot, which always grows brilliantly, whatever the vagaries of the season, on my allotment. I have it roasted, often with a dash of balsamic vinegar, throughout the summer, served as a side dish with salads or most meat dishes. At this time of year, when I only have a few little roots left in the ground, I throw a couple in the juicer with some home-grown dessert apples, the juice of one orange and a thumb-sized piece of root ginger – divine! The beetroot imparts a pleasant, slightly earthy tone and jewel-like colour, but otherwise it’s a delicious pick-you-up. And herbalist friends of mine rate beetroot extremely highly in terms of its infection-fighting, immune-system-building properties… It is so good for you! Juicers aren’t cheap, but if you grow a lot of your own produce, they are an amazing way of making vitamin-rich, goodness-packed juices for next-to-nothing. Yes, there are lots of pieces to wash up, but I would never make just one glass at a time, so it’s worth the little extra washing-up effort. I like to strain the resulting juice through a sieve lined with a muslin cloth too, for a completely clear juice – but that’s just my personal preference. If you don’t mind the juice cloudy, just serve it straight from the juicer.

Beetroot, apple, orange and ginger juice

I also have a simple electric citrus press that I bought for less than £10 in the January sales one year, and it’s great for juicing oranges for breakfast. You can put whole oranges through the juicer, but if you leave the skin and pith on (other than on the odd slice of lemon or lime), it can leave a bitter aftertaste and make the juice excessively (and unpleasantly) frothy. Easier by far to juice citrus fruit separately and add to other juice as you require. I do it by hand for the odd one or two, of course, but an electric press is handy for a houseful…

My last piece of juicing equipment is a blender: this comes into its own in the summer when I have a glut of strawberries. The taste of liquidised strawberries with just a hint of sifted icing sugar and maybe the juice of an orange, served over ice, is sublime – and the ultimate luxury for those of us who grow our own! Pineapples, too, are delicious liquidised with orange juice and ice in the winter, when they’re at their cheapest in the shops. Funnily enough, if you put them through the juicer, you lose the texture and with it the taste, but unsieved, just whizzed in the blender, they make a fantastic smoothie with a real zing of the Tropics.

The shops are full of the latest wonder juices combining weird and wonderful ingredients like kale and chard. The beauty of growing your own is that you can experiment and see what you like. I find apples always make a good base (and I always have plenty), as does the odd spritz of lemon juice or cucumber, but thereafter just add whatever you crave, or is lying around in the fridge. It’s a great way of using up fruit and vegetables you don’t know what else to do with too – and if you don’t particularly like the results, well, you can always add other ingredients until you do – or at a pinch, feed the compost heap (which is where it would have gone anyway!).

Enjoy! Juice is definitely one of nature’s best medicines…

Autumn walk

Perfect Picnic Fare – Apple-icious!

Apple treeLast weekend’s Radio 2 Festival in a Day in Hyde Park was the perfect opportunity to pack up a picnic and relish the delights of outdoor eating. We always take a “posh” picnic to this kind of event, along with Wimbledon and Eastbourne tennis championships, and once you’ve set the standard, there’s no going back. Cheese sandwiches and a bag of crisps just won’t cut the mustard!

At this time of year I’m invariably inundated with apples, both at home – Katy – and down at the allotment, where I’ve an ever-bountiful Bramley tree, Greensleeves (my least favourite), a Cox type (variety unknown, but also a prolific fruiter with lovely, large, red/green fruit) and a small Spartan with its characteristic deep red to purplish apples. After last year’s bumper harvest, I thought this year wouldn’t be anywhere near as good, but I’ve had surprisingly healthy crops. The Greensleeves is the only one with very few fruit, and as I’m considering taking it out over winter to make more room for soft fruit on my downsized plot next year, it’s probably no bad thing.

With plenty of apples to go at, my menu for last Sunday was self-evident: a delicious sausage and apple plait, which is one of my family’s favourite picnic treats, and a spicy apple shortbread, which always goes down well with a flask of tea mid-afternoon. Take a box of salad (do NOT add dressing beforehand if you want to avoid soggy leaves!), fresh ciabatta, some upmarket crisps, olives (sadly left behind in the fridge in our case…) and a bottle of nice, chilled wine or beer, and you have the makings of a veritable feast!

Sausage & Apple Plait

350g ready-rolled puff pastry

3 tbsp semolina

500g good sausagemeat

75g Cheddar cheese, grated

1 medium onion, finely chopped

2 large cooking apples, grated (add lemon juice to stop browning)

Pinch of paprika

Handful of sage leaves, chopped

Seasoning

1 egg, beaten

Sesame or poppy seeds (optional)

Preheat oven to 200°C/Gas 6. Roll out pastry to a rectangle measuring 26 x 26 cm, neaten edges. Gently mark 3 strips lengthways without cutting through the pastry. Cut the side strips in diagonal sections at 2.5 cm intervals, leaving the centre strip intact. Sprinkle the centre with semolina to stop the pastry becoming soggy during cooking.

Mix together the sausagemeat, onion, apple, cheese, paprika, sage and seasoning. Place the mixture evenly down the centre strip. Dampen the outer strips with water and plait over the filling, folding each strip alternately over the next from each side. Brush with beaten egg and sprinkle over sesame or poppy seeds if wished. Transfer carefully to a greased baking sheet.

Bake in the hot oven for 20 minutes, then lower the temperature to 150°C and cook for a further 40 minutes. Serve warm or cold – delicious!

Spiced apple shortbread

75g butter, softened

40g caster sugar

75g plain white flour

40g semolina

1 large cooking apple, grated

125g sultanas

½ tsp mixed spice

2 tbsp soft brown sugar

1 tsp lemon juice

Icing sugar and lemon juice to ice

Grease a shallow baking tin (18 cm square).

Mix first four ingredients in a food processor or beat with a hand whisk until the mixture forms a ball. Press into the greased tin and prick with a fork. Bake for 15 mins at 180°C or until just golden.

Mix the grated apple, sultanas, spice and brown sugar and spoon onto the cooked shortbread. Cook for a further 15 mins or so, then remove from oven and allow to cool.

Mix up a simple glacé icing with a couple of tbsp sifted icing sugar and lemon juice added until a drizzling consistency is reached. Drizzle in diagonal lines over the shortbread and set before serving, sliced into squares. Leo and Popy in long grass summer 2014