Category Archives: Juice

Apples aplenty – and cavalcades of kale

Cox apples_landscape

‘Tis definitely apple season in all its joyous abundance – the ground beneath my orchard trees is covered with windfalls, some just slightly peck-marked, others victim to brown rot or insect damage from within. The plums were a martyr to moth damage earlier this year too, with a poor harvest in any case, but very few that were actually edible, as most had maggots in – yuk! Now’s the time to put greasebands round the trees to stop the moths sheltering overwinter – and next spring I’ll try and remember to hang pheromone traps to catch the other kinds of moths that cause so much damage to plums.

In the meantime, what to do with all these apples? The obligatory and delicious apple pies and crumbles, of course, plus apple juices and compotes for the freezer or to eat with my breakfast muesli. I like to use them in soup too, not only my favourite tomato, apple & celery, but with other strong-tasting vegetables to add an undernote of sweetness and some body. I’ve currently got an excellent crop of spinach and Swiss chard from both my spring and September sowings, so spinach soup was calling to me. I usually make spinach & pea soup with frozen peas, but had no peas in the freezer as I tend to use fresh veg through the summer months. Inspiration descended with the notion of combining spinach and apples in a soup, with a smattering of bulb fennel for good luck, since I’ve managed to grow it successfully for the first time – very good it was too!

Spinach, Apple & Fennel Soup – serves 6

Spinach, apple and fennel soup

500g spinach, washed, thick stalks removed, and roughly chopped
2 large eating apples, peeled, cored and diced – I used a Cox type
50g butter (or olive oil if you prefer)
1 medium onion, finely chopped
2 sticks celery, finely chopped
1 clove garlic, finely chopped
1 bulb fennel, chopped, plus a handful of the feathery fronds to add at the end
Few sprigs of thyme, leaves removed
Grated rind of 1 lemon
1 bay leaf
1 litre chicken (or vegetable) stock
Handful of red lentils (optional)
Seasoning

Melt the butter or olive oil in large pan and gently fry the diced onion, fennel, celery and garlic until soft and golden – about 10 minutes. Then add the diced apple, thyme leaves and bay leaf and stir for a couple of minutes. Add the chopped spinach leaves – it will look like a huge pile, but they soon wilt down. Finally, add the stock, a handful of red lentils (to thicken – leave out if you prefer) and seasoning, bring to the boil and cook for 20-25 minutes until nicely tender. Leave to cool, then blend in a liquidizer.

Serve with a swirl of cream or crème fraiche and homemade rolls straight from the oven.

Another revelation in the apple stakes was that apple juice with kale and fennel isn’t bitter at all, but rather delicious. Kale is another crop that just keeps on giving this year – strictly speaking, I grow cavolo nero for its beautiful dark green, crinkly leaves. It is so good for us, it’s a shame not to use it in as many ways as possible. I don’t get my juicer out as often as I should, but having experienced a sublime Green Goddess juice on my recent trip to the States, I thought I’d experiment. Cue 4 or 5 Cox-type apples, chopped kale (stalks removed), a quarter of a lime, a quarter of a fennel bulb and a knob of ginger. I say Cox-type as I sadly have no idea which variety mine is – it was in the allotment when I took it over, resembles a Cox (but without the scab problems that can afflict Cox apples proper), and is always extremely prolific, juicy and tasty. It stores quite well in the garage too. And the juice? – Divine! Do try it and see.

Apple and kale juice

Another apple creation was inspired by a recipe I read in the Waitrose Kitchen magazine on my flight to Chicago. Conveniently, I knew I’d be able to track the recipe down online when I got home, but rather more impressively, I actually remembered to do so after a couple of weeks away! I’m always on the lookout for new ice cream recipes, so this one was extra-tempting: who could resist the prospect of toffee apple ice cream?! The original recipe used bought ice cream (the horror!), but I made my own and swirled it all together rather than layering – truly reminiscent of those brittle toffee apples of our childhood, but without the associated dental challenges!

Toffee Apple Ice Cream

Toffee apple ice cream

125g granulated sugar
5 tbsp water
600ml whipping cream
1 tsp vanilla extract

50g light brown soft sugar
50g wholemeal flour (I used self-raising as that’s what I had, but plain would be fine)
½ tsp ground cinnamon
70g butter, cubed
Salt to taste
100g caster sugar
70ml double cream
3 eating apples, peeled, cored and diced
juice of half lemon

First, make the vanilla ice cream by placing 125g granulated sugar and 4 tbsp water in a small pan, allow the sugar to melt, then continue to cook over a gentle heat for 5 mins until syrupy. Allow to cool completely. Whip 600ml whipping cream with the cold syrup and vanilla extract until it thickens and just begins to hold its shape. Pour into an ice-cream maker (mine is a basic Magimix Glacier model where you have to freeze the bowl in the freezer overnight beforehand: simple but effective). It should take about 30-40 minutes to churn, and while that’s doing you can get on with the rest.

Preheat the oven to 150˚C, gas 3. Line a medium baking tray with baking parchment. For the crumble, put the brown sugar, flour and cinnamon in a bowl, then rub in 30g cubed butter and a pinch of salt, until the mixture resembles fine, gritty sand. Spread out on the tray and bake for 10 minutes, stirring halfway through, until pale golden and crisp. Set aside to cool.

Put the caster sugar in a large frying pan with 2 tbsp water. Heat gently, stirring until the sugar has dissolved. Then without stirring, bring to the boil over a medium-high heat and simmer briskly for about 4 minutes, until a dark golden caramel forms. If it colours unevenly, swirl the pan. Remove the pan from the heat; stir in the cream and a pinch more salt. Add the remaining 40g butter and stir until a smooth caramel forms. Pour into a heatproof bowl. Return the unwashed pan to the heat and add the diced apples (sprinkled with lemon juice to prevent browning). Cook, stirring, for 10 minutes, until softened and golden. Add to the caramel bowl and allow to cool.

If the ice cream is ready before the remaining ingredients are cool, just transfer it to a large freezer container and freeze until everything is cool. When you’re ready, gently fold in the crumble chunks and caramel apples until just mixed and return to the freezer to finish freezing. Remove from the freezer 20-30 minutes before serving – and enjoy!

My final offering today is hardly a recipe, more an assembly of garden produce that, combined, make a wonderfully refreshing autumn kale salad. It was inspired by a delicious cabbage and kale salad I had at one of my daughter-in-law’s friend’s houses in Ohio. She’d used a bagged salad from Costco (costing in excess of $5!), which even included raw Brussels sprouts (and I, a confirmed sprout hater, liked them – perhaps raw is the way to go!). I used vegetables from the allotment, with finely chopped raw kale, calabrese leaves, red lettuce, sliced fennel, toasted sunflower, pumpkin seeds and peanuts, dried cranberries, served with herb-roasted carrots, beetroot, red onion and potatoes, topped with a smattering of griddled halloumi (you could use feta or goat’s cheese too), and dressed with a lime, olive oil and pomegranate molasses dressing – so good! (And all the better for mostly being home-grown 😊).

Kale and roasted root salad

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Juice is the best medicine…

Autumn walk, into the sun

It’s that time of year when everyone starts to get colds and sniffles, it’s wet outside more than it’s dry, daylight hours are limited and the gardens have started to take on their drab late autumn/winter coats as the last of the brilliant leaf colour fades. I’ve had a persistent tickly cough since returning from Crete with a heavy cold in mid-October, although my fruit and vegetable-intensive diet normally means I miss the worst of the bugs. I blame the Italian tourist sniffing and sneezing next to me on the bus down to the South coast of Crete….

When you are feeling under the weather, there are certain foods you seem to crave. I love hot blackcurrant with a squeeze of fresh lemon to soothe my throat and if you have a juicer, fresh juice goes down a treat: you can feel it doing you good and fighting all the germs as it slips down! Another dark red superfood is beetroot, which always grows brilliantly, whatever the vagaries of the season, on my allotment. I have it roasted, often with a dash of balsamic vinegar, throughout the summer, served as a side dish with salads or most meat dishes. At this time of year, when I only have a few little roots left in the ground, I throw a couple in the juicer with some home-grown dessert apples, the juice of one orange and a thumb-sized piece of root ginger – divine! The beetroot imparts a pleasant, slightly earthy tone and jewel-like colour, but otherwise it’s a delicious pick-you-up. And herbalist friends of mine rate beetroot extremely highly in terms of its infection-fighting, immune-system-building properties… It is so good for you! Juicers aren’t cheap, but if you grow a lot of your own produce, they are an amazing way of making vitamin-rich, goodness-packed juices for next-to-nothing. Yes, there are lots of pieces to wash up, but I would never make just one glass at a time, so it’s worth the little extra washing-up effort. I like to strain the resulting juice through a sieve lined with a muslin cloth too, for a completely clear juice – but that’s just my personal preference. If you don’t mind the juice cloudy, just serve it straight from the juicer.

Beetroot, apple, orange and ginger juice

I also have a simple electric citrus press that I bought for less than £10 in the January sales one year, and it’s great for juicing oranges for breakfast. You can put whole oranges through the juicer, but if you leave the skin and pith on (other than on the odd slice of lemon or lime), it can leave a bitter aftertaste and make the juice excessively (and unpleasantly) frothy. Easier by far to juice citrus fruit separately and add to other juice as you require. I do it by hand for the odd one or two, of course, but an electric press is handy for a houseful…

My last piece of juicing equipment is a blender: this comes into its own in the summer when I have a glut of strawberries. The taste of liquidised strawberries with just a hint of sifted icing sugar and maybe the juice of an orange, served over ice, is sublime – and the ultimate luxury for those of us who grow our own! Pineapples, too, are delicious liquidised with orange juice and ice in the winter, when they’re at their cheapest in the shops. Funnily enough, if you put them through the juicer, you lose the texture and with it the taste, but unsieved, just whizzed in the blender, they make a fantastic smoothie with a real zing of the Tropics.

The shops are full of the latest wonder juices combining weird and wonderful ingredients like kale and chard. The beauty of growing your own is that you can experiment and see what you like. I find apples always make a good base (and I always have plenty), as does the odd spritz of lemon juice or cucumber, but thereafter just add whatever you crave, or is lying around in the fridge. It’s a great way of using up fruit and vegetables you don’t know what else to do with too – and if you don’t particularly like the results, well, you can always add other ingredients until you do – or at a pinch, feed the compost heap (which is where it would have gone anyway!).

Enjoy! Juice is definitely one of nature’s best medicines…

Autumn walk