When things go wrong in the kitchen…

Wisley Oct 2019 lake
RHS Wisley – on a rare fine Sunday

With a crazily busy working schedule throughout October, wet weekends have at least afforded me the opportunity to bake, and using up windfall apples has been high on the agenda, with lots of apples falling off the trees much earlier than I’d usually expect. I made my go-to apple favourites including spiced apple shortbread, traditional apple pie, apple juice and apple compote in various guises, but when a colleague on the Foodie Translators Facebook page posted a recipe for apple cider doughnuts similar to the ones we’d tasted in an apple farm in New England back in September, I was tempted to experiment. Unfortunately, the recipe was an American one and, despite using proper measuring cups, I somehow came unstuck. It’s not often I have culinary disasters, but this was one such day. I used self-raising flour with only 1 tsp baking powder, rather than the 1 1/2 tsp the recipe recommends, so that could have been an issue, as could the dilemma of how to measure solid butter in tablespoons. Turns out (thanks to my American daughter-in-law for enlightening me later) that the American ‘sticks’ of butter (so-called because they are long narrow sticks, half the weight of our 250g (8oz) slabs) are marked in tablespoons – of course they are! Whatever I did wrong, the mixture rose like a soufflé, then promptly sank again, spreading all down the sides of my muffin cases and ring moulds. It steadfastly refused to set, so I ended up leaving it in much longer than the recipe suggested – with the upshot, when they finally came out and cooled, that they were nothing more than crumbs! Tasty crumbs admittedly, but crumbs nonetheless. Reluctant to throw them away, I scraped them out of the tins and these are the two recipes I salvaged them in – very satisfying that my disaster actually turned into two delicious creations and another bag of crumbs in the freezer – waste not, want not :-).

The first was a vaguely remembered childhood treat: chocolate rum truffles, but made with cake crumbs rather than the more decadent ganache truffles you buy from upmarket chocolate shops. These are not dissimilar to the inside of that Viennese classic, the delightfully pink Punschtorte, but without the lurid pink icing. I scoured my cookbooks and the internet, without finding exactly what I wanted, then cobbled together something along the lines of what I remembered and hoped to achieve – success!

Chocolate Rum Truffles – makes 12

Chocolate rum truffles

6oz cake crumbs (any sponge cake will do – mine were spiced with cinnamon and nutmeg, but that’s not essential)
4oz ground almonds
2 heaped tbsp good jam (I used gooseberry, but plum or apricot would work too)
1 tbsp cocoa powder, sifted
1 tbsp caster sugar
2 tbsp dark rum
4oz dark chocolate, to coat (or use chocolate vermicelli)

Blitz crumbs in a food processor, then add the ground almonds, caster sugar and sifted cocoa powder. Warm the jam and sieve to remove any lumps, then stir into the mixture with the rum – or mix on a low speed if using a food processor. Mould into 12 balls and place in cake cases. Leave to set in the fridge before melting the chocolate (I do mine in the microwave at 80% for 1 minute, followed by 30-second blasts, stirring each time, until just melted, but you can melt in the traditional way in a bowl over a pan of simmering water if you prefer). Coat the truffle balls by dipping in the melted chocolate using a fork, or kitchen tongs, then set on baking paper before returning to the cases. Enjoy – all the better if you’ve rescued the crumbs from a culinary disaster in the first place!

My next crumb salvage operation was inspired by a suggestion from another colleague on Foodie Translators, although I have had this recipe in one of my ancient cookery leaflets for a while. This particular glossy leaflet was a forerunner of the popular dairy cookbooks that came out in the early 80s, and was given to me by another translator colleague and good friend many years ago. Called “Clever with Cream”, it is, as you’d expect, all about using cream in many different ways. This recipe comes under the “Crème Continental” page and has the enchanting name of “Danish Peasant Girl with a Veil” (Bondepige med Slor in Danish!). As ever, I ended up adapting the recipe to suit what I had on hand, but it worked very well – can’t think why I haven’t made it before!

Danish Peasant Girl with a Veil – serves 2-3

Danish Peasant Girl with Veil

2-3 large eating apples
Juice and rind of half a lemon
1 tsp cinnamon
sugar to taste
4oz cake crumbs
1oz butter
1 tbsp Demerara sugar
1/4 pint double cream, whipped

Slice apples, sprinkle with lemon and cinnamon and cook gently with a dash of water in a pan (or in the microwave) until tender. You can add sugar if you like, but this will depend on the sweetness of your apples. I used a Cox variety and they really don’t need any extra sugar. Stir in the lemon rind. Set aside to cool.

Set oven to 180°C fan/Gas 5. Melt the butter in a small frying pan and fry the crumbs until crisp and golden, stirring continuously. Watch them like a hawk as they can catch very quickly! Stir in the Demerara sugar.

Place half the crumb mixture at the bottom of a small greased ovenproof dish – I used a straight-sided soufflé dish about 6″ in diameter – then add the cooled apple compote, straining off any excess liquid beforehand. Finish with another layer of crumbs, then place in the preheated oven for 15-20 minutes, checking to make sure it doesn’t get too brown. Remove from the oven and allow to chill before topping with a swirly layer of whipped cream. Decorate as you wish – I used dried apple rings, but you could also use toasted flaked almonds or spare toasted crumbs.

Wisley Oct 2019 orange tree
RHS Wisley again – so glad the sun shone for once

 

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