Blackcurrants – not just for Ribena!

Blackcurrant fool individual

Berries and currants of all hues, shapes and sizes are coming thick and fast in the fruit garden in this unexpected July heatwave. The raspberries are fantastic this year – must be all that winter rainfall – and the gooseberries and currants aren’t far behind. All apart from the redcurrants, that is; they’ve been stripped (by birds/mice?!) despite being comprehensively netted! Raspberries and strawberries I eat as they come, but most of the currant family tend to need cooking before eating. Whitecurrants are the honourable exception, being delicious raw like mini grapes, added to salads or as elegant decorative touches. I do hope to make some jelly when I get a spare minute or two, but may have to add some blackcurrants to give a hint of colour in the absence of the usual redcurrants.

I’ve already got a number of blackcurrants in the freezer from last year’s bountiful crop, so I’ve been experimenting with this year’s pickings. Having my younger son and his ice cream-loving girlfriend to stay for a few weeks while they were between flats was a great incentive to try a blackcurrant ripple ice cream, a variation on a recipe I found in the June edition of Sainsbury’s magazine. The original used cherries, but I figured blackcurrants could work as well, if not better.

Blackcurrant Ripple Ice Cream

Blackcurrant ripple ice cream

250-300g blackcurrants
300g caster sugar
2 large egg whites
1 kg full-fat Greek yogurt

Stew the blackcurrants and 50g sugar gently in a small pan, stirring until the juice runs, until the currants soften and form a compote. Allow to cool.
Mix the egg whites with the remaining sugar in  heatproof bowl set over a pan of simmering water. Stir constantly until the mixture is hot, but not boiling – 2-3 minutes.
Transfer to a large, cold bowl and whisk with an electric mixer for 5 minutes until you have  a cool, stiff and fluffy texture.
Whisk in the yogurt, then transfer to an ice cream maker and churn until frozen. Of course, you can make it the old-fashioned way by freezing for an hour or so, then whisking in the ice crystals and repeating until softly frozen.
Fold through the blackcurrant compote for a rippled effect and return to the freezer for at least 4 hours to set.
This makes an extremely light, yet creamy and tangy ice cream., good served with fruit or on its own, with lots of contented lip-licking.

Having made the ice cream, I was left with two egg yolks skulking in the fridge. I normally make Chocolate Custard Creams or add them to quiche, but this week, in sweltering heat, I was tempted by the idea of a blackcurrant fool, using freshly made custard with the egg yolks as the base – satisfying use of leftovers too! I’d made double the quantity of blackcurrant compote in the first place, so enough for the ice cream and the fool – making assembling this even easier. You can add fresh raspberries and the food processing stage to replace some of the compote if you prefer. You could equally well use ready-made custard or custard made with custard powder if you don’t fancy making fresh custard.

Blackcurrant Fool – serves 2-3

Blackcurrant fool duo

2 egg yolks
1 tbsp caster (or vanilla) sugar
1 heaped tsp cornflour
150ml milk
few drops vanilla extract
250-300g blackcurrants
50g caster sugar (or to taste)
100ml double cream, whipped

Combine the egg yolks, 1 tbsp caster sugar and cornflour in a small bowl. Stir in the cold milk, then strain into a small pan. Cook gently until the mixture starts to thicken, stirring constantly. Add the vanilla extract to the custard. Allow to cool.
Stew the blackcurrants and 50g sugar gently in a small pan, stirring until the juice runs, until the currants soften and form a compote. Allow to cool.
Blend the custard and compote in a food processor, then push through a sieve to remove any seeds/skin.
Whip the cream and fold into the fruit mixture. You can use a balloon whisk to combine if the cream is too thick to fold readily!
Spoon into sundae dishes and chill, then decorate with fruit of your choice, or mint leaves/toasted  almond flakes to garnish.

Incidentally, if it’s not soft fruit season, the Chocolate Custard Creams I mentioned earlier follow the same method for the custard, but stir 60g chopped plain chocolate into the custard immediately after it thickens. Continue stirring until the chocolate melts completely, then transfer to ramekin dishes and decorate with chopped walnuts or grated chocolate. Tastes amazingly decadent for such a simple pud….

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