Tiptoe through the tulips…

Jan Reus tulips-001

Despite the lateness of the season, this has been a splendid year for tulips after all. My last, the delectable cream and lilac Atlantis (below), have just come into bloom and we’re almost at the end of May! The beautiful burgundy shot silk Jan Reus (above) have just gone over, having come out weeks ago, and I’ve had a succession of others in between. Once again, I’ve been glad that I didn’t plant them up in mixtures, as there seems no way of guaranteeing that they’ll all come out together. Far better, in my view, to have a solid block of colour in one pot and know that they will all be out at the same time.

Tulip Atlantis

I had two double varieties this year, Antraciet, a deep blood red, and Chato, a flamboyant magenta pink. Both have been superb, but (note to self!) very top-heavy in rain, especially the huge, paeony-flowered Chato. After an initial dry spell, we had a short, sharp shower one afternoon and I went out afterwards to find half my blooms neatly snapped off about four inches beneath the flower! Fortunately, I strive to have a vase for every occasion, so for once had my own tulips all over the house as cut flowers. They lasted surprisingly well, becoming even more exotic as they faded and you could appreciate them at close quarters. Still, I don’t think I’ll be cutting them deliberately any time soon…

Tulip Chato in tub
Tulip Chato

The glass “caterpillar” vase I was given for Christmas came in particularly handy for displaying a row of decapitated Chato flowerheads, and an antique turquoise jug looked superb too:

The double Antraciet, planted in big wooden barrels like all of my container-grown tulips, were weeks after my friend’s garden-planted bulbs of the same variety – perhaps mine were planted more deeply? Either way, when they finally opened, they were lovely, not quite as blowsy as Chato, but a gorgeous, rich maroon colour, almost deep fuchsia pink in bright sunlight. Not being quite as huge, they seemed to fare better with the rain too, although I did find them covered in slugs and snails as I walked past one showery evening! If it’s not one thing, it’s another….

Tulips Anthraciet
Tulip Antraciet

The earliest of my tulips  to flower were perhaps the most disappointing, the scented bronzy-orange Request. I had planted these in a tub where I knew there were already some feathered yellow early tulips, planted very deep, which come up year on year, and the whole barrel stands in front of a glorious golden philadelphus (the deliciously-scented mock orange or Philadelphus coronariusAureus‘). Colourwise, the combination was stunning, but sadly only 7 of the 15 new tulips I’d planted flowered – the rest were blind. Sarah Raven, good as ever, have credited my account for replacement tulips next season, but it is disappointing not to get quite the show you’d anticipated. I couldn’t detect any particular scent from the tulips either – but hey, you can’t win them all!

Tulip Request & yellow

So, a good year for tulips, all in all, but I think next year I’ll try and remember not to order such late varieties. As it is, I’m now going to have a bit of a scramble to empty this year’s containers and plant up my summer schemes in a relatively short space of time. Fortunately, I’ve finally managed to track down some large oak half-barrels to replace my existing ones, which are falling apart after a good 20 years’ sterling service! They are far too heavy to lift once planted up, so I’m still going to have to empty the old ones before I can remove them and plant up the new models in situ. A good excuse for a complete change of compost (and hopefully get rid of any vine weevil grubs that will inevitably be lurking in the old barrels after all this time).
Brandy Snap tulips allotment

The remaining bulbs can be planted up at the allotment, or on my dry and sunny bed at the front of the house, to see if they come good another year. After an excellent showing of the Brandy Snap collection I transplanted two years ago, I’m hopeful that they will flower again at some point – but I still only transplant decent-sized bulbs. If they’ve split into little bulblets when you dig them up, it’s unlikely they’ll come again and can just be discarded. Thank you, tulips, for a magnificent month of colour!

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