That old black magic

A very enjoyable afternoon down at the allotment today after missing out last weekend due to gardening duties at home! Hard to know which to favour, but I figure that I see the home garden more (especially from my study window whilst I’m working), so I do like it to look nice.
Last weekend’s job was to distribute the compost around the plants that needed it the most – there’s never enough to go round everything, small garden or not! I have two of those “Dalek” compost bins hidden away behind my garage and work on a rotational basis: one is filled whilst the other rots down for a year, then in early Spring I empty the well-rotted bin and start again. I also have a couple of smaller overflow bins close to the back door (one an old wormery, the other a 50 l plastic container I used to use for recycling before the council decided to collect all our recyclable waste in a separate wheelie bin). It’s quite a trek to the garage on the opposite side of my driveway, so it’s handy to be able to empty the compost into the closer bins on a daily basis, then I tip these into the bigger bins periodically – trying not to leave it too long as they get VERY heavy. Both of them have drainage holes, which helps, and I suppose it serves the additional purpose of rotating the compost when it’s tipped out. It amazes me how much compostable stuff you accrue in the kitchen each day – I have one of those plastic cutlery drainers (without the dividers) in my half-sink, which I means I can empty my teapot (loose-leaf tea) straight into there, and of course all the peelings and vegetable waste, flower stalks, etc. Mine must get emptied at least once a day, more in summer or if I’m making juice. You can get those neat little crock pots with charcoal filters from places like Lakeland, but that wouldn’t be any use for draining tea – and mine is emptied so often that smells aren’t an issue.
In my previous 2-acre garden, I had two massive compost bays each the size of a small car, and the compost was to die for as it had been accumulating for so many years – helped by the vast expanse of lawn to mow with the ride-on mower and resulting grass clippings! My boys were young teenagers at the time and took great pleasure in mowing the lawn (perhaps that’s why they both passed their driving test first time?!) on the tractor mower, with the ability to turn it on a sixpence – unlike their mother…. Needless to say, one of the few things I took with me when leaving that garden was several bags of rich, crumbly compost to start the blank canvas that was to become my current garden.
I have two small compost bays made from pallets down at the allotments, again working on the rotational basis, but now sadly in need of repair as they’ve been there 7 or 8 years. Another plotholder (and fellow dance class attendee!) has kindly let me have a few spare pallets and suggested cable ties to attach them together, rather than nails. That will have to be next weekend’s job now, as it’s Mother’s Day tomorrow, but I look forward to seeing whether that works.
The main beneficiaries of the resulting black magic tend to be any new plants/shrubs and anywhere I’ve created new beds and our sticky Wadhurst clay is still to the fore. You can sometimes see little brandling worms in the compost when you dig it out and I swear you can hear the plants sighing with pleasure as you spread it around. It certainly looks fabulous to see all those new spring shoots surrounded by dark crumbly compost. A very satisfying – if exhausting – task!
It had been my intention to go down to the allotment after finishing mid-afternoon, but an unexpected and nonetheless welcome invitation to afternoon tea put paid to that, so I ended up dashing down in the twilight to harvest some leeks and purple-sprouting broccoli for dinner. One of the things I love most about growing my own is the challenge of returning with delicious produce and deciding what to cook: this was the result last Sunday – so simple, yet absolutely scrumptious. The simplest things often are the best….

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Pasta with broccoli and anchovy sauce
Serves 2
6oz pasta – I used linguine, but suit yourself
8oz purple-sprouting broccoli
3 tbsp olive oil
2 tbsp sultanas
1 red onion, peeled and sliced
½ tin anchovies, chopped
1oz pine kernels
Salt and black pepper
Parmesan or Pecorino cheese, finely grated to serve

Soak the sultanas in boiling water. Microwave or steam the broccoli for 3-4 mins until tender – if using calabrese rather than the finer purple-sprouting broccoli, you might want to chop this into smaller florets and any thick stems into round chunks first. Drain and set aside.
Cook the onion in the olive oil until soft, add the anchovies, drained sultanas, pine kernels and broccoli, stir gently, then cook gently for about 10 mins to allow the flavours to infuse. Meanwhile cook the pasta as normal, then add to the frying pan, season and serve with the grated cheese.

So flavoursome, yet with such simple ingredients – enjoy!

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